mojosmom: (Default)
How did it get to be September already? Gosh, the summer has simply flown. The Chicago Jazz Fest starts tonight (well, actually, last night with the Jazz Club Tour), and I'm planning to hit tomorrow night's concert, as well as the day and evening events on Saturday and Sunday. Rain is predicted, so I will take my umbrella - to ward off sun and rain as required.

This being Chicago, there's been a lot of jazz this summer, and last Thursday I went to hear trumpeter Corey Wilkes (and friends) at Millennium Park. Went back there on Saturday for the grand finale performance of Chicago Dancing, which I hadn't planned to do until my younger sister said that a friend of hers was having a dance performed there by River North Dance. Also performing were the Joffrey, the Paul Taylor Dance Company, dancers from the New York City Ballet, the Martha Graham Dance Company and Ballet West.

Earlier that day, a friend and I went to Graceland Cemetery for the Chicago Architecture Foundation's "Women of Influence" tour. It was very interesting, and even though I knew about most of the women the docent talked about, I learned new things about them, and met some new ones. Walking tours are free to members; now that I have all this free time, I just might have to join. I'd definitely get my money's worth.

Friday evening there was a reception at the Chicago Public Library for the "One Book, Many Interpretations: Second Edition" exhibit, wherein bookbinders were invited to bind copies of the books that have been chosen for the "One Book, One Chicago" program over the last five years. They haven't put the catalogue online yet, though I understand that they are planning to do so. When and if that happens, I'll have to link to it, because there were some stunning pieces. In fact, they were giving out copies of all the books (labeled "This book has been placed here for you to Read, Enjoy and Pass It On . . .") and I picked up Neil Gaiman's "Neverwhere" solely on the strength of the bindings people had done for it, which were quite intriguing. I hadn't liked the one other novel of his I'd read ("American Gods"), so likely would not have considered reading this one otherwise. I also picked up the newest selection, "The Adventures of Augie March", by Saul Bellow.

On Tuesday, I went to the Art Institute to see the show, "Windows on the War: Soviet TASS Posters at Home and Abroad, 1941-1945".
The Motherland Calls!

Fascinating story of how this exhibit came about. Back in 1997, when renovations were going on in the Prints and Drawings Department, a couple of dozen wrapped parcels were found on the back of a shelf in a closet. They contained propaganda posters that had been created during the war by the Soviet news agency, TASS. The exhibition includes these restored posters, as well as some from earlier in Soviet history, some U.S. and British posters using some of the same images, and other Allied propaganda posters. After victory, came false hopes:
"Peace - we won it together"

Went from there to my bank, where I refinanced my mortgage (something I should have done a long time ago, but better late than never).

And in a move that got me much thanks from my fellow Teatro Vista board members, yesterday I made chocolate chip scones and took them to our board meeting. I do so like baking, but you can't bake just a couple of cookies or one cupcake!
mojosmom: (Default)
How did it get to be September already? Gosh, the summer has simply flown. The Chicago Jazz Fest starts tonight (well, actually, last night with the Jazz Club Tour), and I'm planning to hit tomorrow night's concert, as well as the day and evening events on Saturday and Sunday. Rain is predicted, so I will take my umbrella - to ward off sun and rain as required.

This being Chicago, there's been a lot of jazz this summer, and last Thursday I went to hear trumpeter Corey Wilkes (and friends) at Millennium Park. Went back there on Saturday for the grand finale performance of Chicago Dancing, which I hadn't planned to do until my younger sister said that a friend of hers was having a dance performed there by River North Dance. Also performing were the Joffrey, the Paul Taylor Dance Company, dancers from the New York City Ballet, the Martha Graham Dance Company and Ballet West.

Earlier that day, a friend and I went to Graceland Cemetery for the Chicago Architecture Foundation's "Women of Influence" tour. It was very interesting, and even though I knew about most of the women the docent talked about, I learned new things about them, and met some new ones. Walking tours are free to members; now that I have all this free time, I just might have to join. I'd definitely get my money's worth.

Friday evening there was a reception at the Chicago Public Library for the "One Book, Many Interpretations: Second Edition" exhibit, wherein bookbinders were invited to bind copies of the books that have been chosen for the "One Book, One Chicago" program over the last five years. They haven't put the catalogue online yet, though I understand that they are planning to do so. When and if that happens, I'll have to link to it, because there were some stunning pieces. In fact, they were giving out copies of all the books (labeled "This book has been placed here for you to Read, Enjoy and Pass It On . . .") and I picked up Neil Gaiman's "Neverwhere" solely on the strength of the bindings people had done for it, which were quite intriguing. I hadn't liked the one other novel of his I'd read ("American Gods"), so likely would not have considered reading this one otherwise. I also picked up the newest selection, "The Adventures of Augie March", by Saul Bellow.

On Tuesday, I went to the Art Institute to see the show, "Windows on the War: Soviet TASS Posters at Home and Abroad, 1941-1945".
The Motherland Calls!

Fascinating story of how this exhibit came about. Back in 1997, when renovations were going on in the Prints and Drawings Department, a couple of dozen wrapped parcels were found on the back of a shelf in a closet. They contained propaganda posters that had been created during the war by the Soviet news agency, TASS. The exhibition includes these restored posters, as well as some from earlier in Soviet history, some U.S. and British posters using some of the same images, and other Allied propaganda posters. After victory, came false hopes:
"Peace - we won it together"

Went from there to my bank, where I refinanced my mortgage (something I should have done a long time ago, but better late than never).

And in a move that got me much thanks from my fellow Teatro Vista board members, yesterday I made chocolate chip scones and took them to our board meeting. I do so like baking, but you can't bake just a couple of cookies or one cupcake!
mojosmom: (Black cat)
Tell me about it!

I have this problem, too. There are these piles of utterly gorgeous papers in my house, and, every time I have a binding project, I have to find one that I can bear to take scissors and cut into.
mojosmom: (busy bee)
that's what comes of not having posted anything of substance since last month!

Shocking.

So, what have I been up to?

I went to a program at the Goodman Theatre, part of the Horton Foote Festival, called Anatomy of a Trial: To Kill a Mockingbird, The Scottsboro Boys and the Jena 6, and felt the need to shoot my mouth off during the Q&A. (Surprising, I know.) They did a couple of excerpts from the play of To Kill a Mockingbird, and there was a general discussion of race, reportage and the law. The panel consisted of a law professor, a reporter cum lawyer cum actor, and a couple of theatre people, none of whom knew much about the reality of courtroom practice, particularly as regards criminal law. So the Q&A was actually the most interesting part of the event.

A bit of sadness this week in the book and paper arts community. Aiko's Japanese Art Materials
Paper samples
closed Friday, the victim of a combination of slacking sales and a decrease in the availability of quality stock. There was a reception for the staff Tuesday at the Newberry Library, and Chuck (the owner) had a closing "party" on Saturday. He brought out a few special items and had a silent auction, the proceeds of which will go to the Aiko Fellowship at the Center for Book and Paper Arts. It was a beautiful store, with wonderful, helpful, knowledgeable staff, and will be sorely missed. The husband of a local book conservator has put together a book of photographs to help us remember.

Friday, I went to Symphony Center to hear Irvin Mayfield and the New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, with a program called Do You Know What It Means?. When Mayfield came on stage, he was followed by a security guard. This video shows why. It was an awesome concert - it went on for two hours without a break, but it sure didn't feel like two hours. Time flew.

Last night was the last concert of the Newberry Consort's '07-08 season. The news is that they will be moving the Hyde Park concerts from their current location to the Oriental Institute's Khorsabad Gallery (warning - monster huge picture - it was the only one I could find). Also, this year, unlike previous years, their open rehearsals will be free, so if one finds oneself with nothing to do on Thursday afternoon before the concert, one can stop by the Newberry Library and hang out. They did an audience survey last night, and, if you returned it at intermission, your name was entered into a drawing for two tickets to next year's benefit, which will be a showing of the 1912 silent movie Queen Elizabeth, starring Sarah Bernhardt, with music provided by the Consort. My friend Jim was chosen to pull the winning name (the Consort director said they asked him because he is a) a longtime supporter of the group and, b) lives in Howard Mayer Brown's old apartment - Brown was an eminent early music scholar and the Consort is doing programs in his memory). Jim did an excellent job at this - he pulled my name! So I know where I'll be on January 18, 2009. ;-))

Today, I went to the Spertus Institute for a program called Unbuttoned: Clothes and the making of American Jewish comedy, given by Ted Merwin, author of In Their Own Image: New York Jews in Jazz Age Popular Culture. It was a very interesting program. However, among the clips Merwin used to illustrate the discussion was a recording of Fanny Brice singing "Second Hand Rose". As a result, I can't get the tune out of my head!

Most important, my car passed its emissions inspection, which means they'll let me renew my registration.
mojosmom: (Default)
Sad news yesterday. Giuseppe di Stefano has died. (New York Times obit. I was never fortunate enough to hear him live, but his Cavaradossi to Callas' Tosca and Gobbi's Scarpia is probably the best opera recording ever. I listen to it often.

But another old man is still going strong. Last night I went to the Goodman theatre for "A Conversation with Horton Foote", and cake and champagne in honor of his 92nd birthday (coming up next week). I hope I'm in such good shape when I'm ninety-two! (Assuming I get that far, which, considering the longevity on both sides of the family, is a distinct possibility.) I'd seen Blind Date and The Actor last Saturday evening. Apparently the latter is almost completely autobiographical, judging from what he said last night. Tomorrow, A Trip to Bountiful.

Saturday morning I went up to Lakeview to stock up on tea. There's a place there that sells my favorite (Lapsang Souchong) in bulk at a very reasonable price. Then I went over to Aiko's. I'm sad. They are closing in April. Not enough people are doing traditional binding anymore, and not enough people appreciate the quality of the paper and tools at Aiko's or the quality of the people there. They'd rather buy cheap from people who don't even know what mending tissue is. So everything is 30% off, and I spent more than I should. And commiserated with Chuck, who has worked there for 29 years and has been the owner for fifteen. April 11th is their last day, but on the 12th they will have a silent auction of some special items, limited edition books and that sort of thing, with the proceeds going to the Aiko Fellowship at the Center for Book and Paper Arts.

I was at a CLE (continuing legal education) seminar today, and will be again tomorrow.
mojosmom: (busy bee)
It really was a busy week. I've told you about the plays, and Miss Manners. Here's the rest.

Thursday night, I went to a going-away party for a co-worker who is leaving the office to join a local law firm, but left early to go to a reading at 57th Street Books. Kurt Elling (jazz musician and former neighbor) has published a book of his lyrics, so I thought I should pop in for that. Bought the book, of course!

Friday night, there was a lecture at Columbia College by Julie Chen, of Flying Fish Press. I love her work! After the lecture, I went down to the gallery at the Center for Book and Paper Arts to see the current show, "Reading, Writing & 'rithmetic", all sorts of old writing manuals, alphabet books, etc.

Saturday, my friends and I had what will likely be the last picnic of the season. I went that morning to the Green City Market to buy some veggies for the picnic, and while I was there I found some yummy Concord grapes and some Japanese sweet potatoes. I love the latter. I cut them into bite-size pieces, deep-fry them, toss them in a simple syrup flavored with soy sauce, and sesame seeds. Delish!

Sunday afternoon, I went over to the Hyde Park Art Center. They were having artists' receptions for a couple of exhibits. One was student work, and I didn't much care for most of it, though there were a couple of sketches that I liked. But I really liked the "Plate Convergence" exhibit. It consists of plates done by a local ceramicist, as well as historic plates from the Yamaguchi family. And there's a story! In 1592, the Ri brothers were captured during the pottery wars, and brought their art to Japan. The Yamaguchi family learned the art and have been practicing it ever since. Shoji Yamaguchi heard of the "Black Clay of Itawamba County" in Mississippi, and moved there in mid-50's, later marrying an African-American woman (They were tragically killed in a car crash in Japan in 1986, but their son carries on the tradition). Many of his pieces are specifically designed as containers for traditonal African-American foods, like this collards pot:
Collards pot

Then there was an exhibit that included some very cool altered books and book-like pieces. I liked these whimsical "Fungus Beast Books":
Fungus Beast Books 1,2,3

I walked back home via Harold Washington Park, and checked out the boat pond. They've just recently re-opened it with a nice new fountain, but there were only a couple of kids using it. I think it hasn't been re-discovered yet.

other stuff

I talked to my kid sister, who is doing well. She's just started her hormone treatment, and is busily planning a trip to Osaka in October. (Well, she's reading up on Japan, and leaving the planning to the trip organizers!)

Tickets for the Chicago Humanities Festival went on sale to the general public today! YAY! I was surprised, and very pleased, to find that members hadn't glommed onto all the Philip Pullman tickets. I'm going to hear him twice! AND Garry Wills. As well as a performance of Noye's Fludde (unfortunately, not the one at Rockefeller Chapel, because I have a conflict that day), a one-woman show about Hattie McDaniel, a performance of Vivaldi's The Four Seasons with a reading of the sonnets which he wrote, and the closing cabaret concert, featuring songs about the weather! (The theme this year is "The Climate of Concern".) Now you may think that's a lot of stuff, but the fact is that I usually find a lot more events that I want to go to. Oh, well, it saves me juggling and rushing around.
mojosmom: (Default)
Yesterday was the opening day of Silk Road Chicago at the Art Institute. This is a collaboration between the Art Institute, the Chicago Symphony, and Yo-Yo Ma's Silk Road Project. It will go on for the next year, and feature all kinds of great programs. I'd originally planned to get to the museum in time for a 10:30 performance by the Silk Road Ensemble, but fortunately decided instead to be there for the opening ceremonies on the Michigan Avenue steps. It began with a lion dance. No, the famous statues did not come to life. The dance was performed by people from a local Chinese cultural organization. There were speeches, and a performance by members of the Silk Road Ensemble. Yo-Yo was there, just hanging out on the sidewalk with the rest of us, though he was induced to take a seat with the dignitaries at one point. Then with a fanfare played by members of the Chicago Civic Orchestra, the red silk banners dropped over the entrances, and we all trooped inside.

There were performances and demonstrations throughout the museum throughout the day. I enjoyed a Silk Road Ensemble performance in the AIOC's jewel box of a theatre, Fullerton Hall, which included storyteller Ben Haggarty. He had me in tears with his telling of the story of the birth of the pipa, and then we got to hear Yang Wei play it. Actually, I heard him a few times over the course of the afternoon.

After that, I went over to where the Chagall windows used to be (they are currently in restauro) to watch students of the Natya Dance Theatre perform traditional Indian dances. Their instructor also gave a short talk about the history of the dances and some of the technique. I walked back toward the Asian galleries, stopping off to see a demonstration by a Chinese landscape painter, and then went to the Tadao Ando screen gallery, which I visit whenever I'm at the Art Institute. As I came out, I noticed a few chairs in the adjacent gallery, and then Yang Wei and some other members of the ensemble appeared and began to play. They were, it seems, wandering about the museum, playing here and there.

Then outside again, for a dragon dance, and more of the Silk Road Ensemble. I had decided to walk over to Randolph Street, where the Silk Road Oasis was having a sale. This was a space that has been operating for a few months, since the Silk Road Chicago Project was announced. Artists' demonstrations, sales of goods, and related events have been occurring there. But now they were closing, and selling everything, quite literally, down to the cloth panels that had covered tables. My plan had been to see what they had and then go back to the AIOC to hear an oud player performing Greek music from before the Ottoman Empire. But you know what they say about best laid plans. At the Oasis, I found a large, unwieldy, and totally irresistable object. It's two bunches of branches, lacquered and tied together, from which were hanging numerous origami cranes. They had originally had it hanging from the ceiling, but it's now on the wall above my bed. It's about five feet long, and maybe three feet in height (though we were able to fold it) and rather fragile. And I had to carry it on the bus. I figured the museum would not let me bring it in and probably wouldn't want to check it, either, so I just headed home with it.

This turned out to be a good plan, as shortly after I got back, it started pouring. It stopped, however, before I needed to head out again to hear the first Newberry Consort concert of the season. The program was 16th- and 17th-century Spanish music, and they had a much larger group than usual, four voices (it was supposed to be five, but the mezzo couldn't make it). The soprano also teaches at the place where I'm studying Italian. One of those "small world" things. They are starting the concerts a half-hour earlier this year, slightly shortening the pre-concert lecture. This avoids a half-hour of hanging around between lecture and concert, and gives people an opportunity to talk with the performers afterward and also get home a bit earlier.

Today, I met Bookcrosser Mochagirl for brunch. She's visiting her sister here. Had a very nice time discussing the differences between the legal systems (and professional culture) of the U.S., Australia and the U.K.

Then over to the Art Institute again for me, to a concert by the joint forces of the Oriana Singers, Ars Antigua and one member of Ars Musica Chicago. Called "Echoes of the East", it consisted of Italian music of the 14th-, 15th-, and (mostly) 16th-century. I knew it would be good when I looked at the program and saw that it would begin with a delightful little song that is a favorite of mine, Francesco Landini's "Ecco la primavera". The concert was preceded by a slide lecture given by the AIOC's education director, Mary Sue Glosser, whom I always enjoy, and was followed by a short gallery walk. Both focused on "blue-and-white" porcelains, flowers and silk, and how they traveled to, and appear in the art of, the Netherlands.

Unfortunately, in all this running around, I got no work done on my bookbinding project. I'm very much afraid it won't be done as soon as I'd like. I just hope it turns out to be worth the wait!

(Just so you know it's not all culture and glamour in my life, I also: did laundry, shopped for groceries, paid bills, and watched Jeeves and Wooster on TV.)
mojosmom: (CHB)
I went to the opening reception of the "One Book, Many Interpretations" show at the Special Collections Division at the Harold Washington Library Center this evening. Honey, let me tell you, they were pouring wine like it was water. "Um, I don't really need the whole bottle in that plastic cup", but the bartender kept on pouring. At least they had some really good food to cushion the tummy.

The show, which was the whole point of the evening, is absolutely incredible. I've mentioned this show before, but for those who've missed it, the Chicago Public Library invited bookbinders to bind copies of the books that have been chosen for the One Book, One Chicago program. The best of these are part of the show. Technically, all the books were awesome. I did feel that a few were not particularly inspired creatively, and some just didn't speak to me personally. But the overall quality was amazing. Even more amazing was that Lesa (the Exhibit Curator) was able to put this show together in just over a year.

Here's the book I submitted that didn't get accepted: The Coast of Chicago, by Stuart Dybek

There's a small catalogue, too.

Some of us were joking that we came for the people, not the books (there were a lot of CHB people there), but the truth is that, at any opening, you probably spend more time socializing than looking at the art. I'll definitely be going back.

Speaking of socializing, I told Bill D. that I was hoping to go to Venice in February, and that my sister had sent me lots of books, and he said he had lots of books, too, and, by the way, he has a friend there who's a paper marbler and has a shop and is a "sweet guy". I am going to have such a list! I love it.

And met a friend of Barb M's who is a photographer and who has a show opening Friday at the Fine Arts Building. There's an opening at the Center for Book and Paper Arts that evening as well, just a few blocks away, so I think I'll try to do both.

Then I came home, and one of my temporary crowns came off. I called my dentist's office, fully expecting nothing, but their voicemail gave her home #, so I called her and she said, basically, "you can just snap it back in with a bit of toothpaste and then come in on Monday to have it re-cemented and in the meantime, don't floss and don't eat on that side", so "snap" I did. Hope it lasts the weekend! (Did you ever think you'd hear a dentist say, "Don't floss"?)
mojosmom: (Zingers)
I hauled a box of books over to the Hyde Park Co-operative Society for their annual book sale. Every year on Columbus Day weekend, hordes descend, among them myself, and acquire books. All for a good cause (the Co-op) and any leftovers are donated to other non-profits.

Finished paring the leather for my current bookbinding project, punched the holes for sewing, and started to set up the sewing frame. Oy. The bolts were frozen and I could not budge them. So I got out the WD-40, but still had to spritz them a couple of times and use some serious elbow grease. Got them moving, though. But decided to take a break and surf for awhile. (~smile~)

Yesterday, I had a really nice evening at Margaret's. Both Lois (who now lives in Colorado) and Sue (recently moved back from southern California to central Illinois) were in town, so there were some extra folks at dinner, and Lois brought her sister, with whom she was staying. It was pretty much the whole group, too, which is rare. It'll be great to have Sue back in the area (well, okay, Springfield is a 3-4 hour drive, but it's still closer than LA!). And she sure did move at the right time, considering what's happening to real estate prices in southern California. She says that if she'd sold even a month earlier, she'd have gotten $50,000 more, and that people kid her that hers was the last house sold there. But still, she sold "in the 8's", and got a bigger house (and a way bigger yard) in Springfield "in the 3's". She is still in a state of shock over how much lower the cost of living is there. Good move for her, too. In the time I've known her, she's worked her way up the masthead, from lowly reporter to publisher!

Friday night was dinner and theatre with the usual people. Dinner was excellent. The play, on the other hand, was not. I'd have stuck it out if I hadn't been headachey, but under the circs I left at intermission. It was King Lear, with Stacey Keach starring. Sounds like it should be good, right? No. They had to go and "update" it. When you walk into the theatre and see urinals onstage, it's not a good sign. Lear in the first scene is played like a buffoon, and what was that incestuous caress of Goneril's ass? And I really don't see how having Oswald performing oral sex on Regan, or having Edgar smoking crack, adds anything to our understanding and appreciation of the play.

The better cultural event of the week was Raisin, the musical version of Lorraine Hansberry's Raisin in the Sun at Court Theatre. They suffer under some constraints due to the size of the place, and had to have the band onstage, but that was okay. One thing I didn't care for was that they had the cast seated behind the action, along with a small gospel group, when they weren't "onstage", as though they were part of the audience. I found that a bit distracting, especially when they reacted to the performance, but overall, it was a good show. Excellent acting, too.

Most of last week (Monday through Thursday), I was coaching at the Intensive Trial Advocacy program at the University of Chicago's legal clinic. I had great fun, as always, and did two lectures in addition to the small group coaching (one on impeachment and the other on objections/making the record). I kid Herschella that we all come for the food, as they give the faculty lunch every day, and there are two student-faculty dinners, all of which were delicious. It's also quite pleasant not to have to set my alarm, as the faculty meetings are in the late morning and I'm only a five minute drive from the Law School.

All in all, a good week.
mojosmom: (Work)
When I was in kindergarten? first grade? we played bean bag. This has now apparently become a hugely popular bar game. So far, fine. But for some reason that I cannot fathom, it is now also known as "cornholing". As far as I'm concerned, "cornholing" has an entirely different meaning, one not usually discussed on the noon news or in the community newspaper. Yet, today, I see this headline: "Cornhole in your own backyard . . . It's an all-American pastime.". Okay, but I hope you have a very high (and solid) fence!!!

We took the summer interns out after work today. The place we went has an outdoor patio, so we hung out there, eating unhealthy appetizers and drinking beer and wine. Nice.

I got an email today from Goodman Theatre, offering free tickets to one of the plays in their Latino Theater Festival. So I got right on the phone. Who cares if the show is "in Spanish with some English translations"? It sounds interesting: "Las Mil y Una Noches, performed by Spain's Comediants , is a 'sensual and provocative exploration set in a demolished library in Baghdad."

My book did not get accepted for the "One Book, Many Interpretations" show. I'm disappointed, but not hugely surprised, considering the competition! But I still get invited to hang with the movers and shakers at the opening reception! So that will be fun.

My dentist's office has, once again, called to change my appointment, since my dentist has been pushing back her return from maternity leave (can't say that I blame her!). But this latest change has meant that both appointments needed to be changed. My first appointment will be on a day I was thinking of taking off anyway, and I was able to schedule the second on Columbus Day, which is a holiday for us, so I won't need to take a sick day for that. In other words, it's worked out okay for me. I just hope this is it for the changes!
mojosmom: (busy bee)
Here's why )

Yesterday, I took Lilith to the vet for her triennial rabies shot and annual check-up. As expected, she needs dental work. So on Friday she will have a couple of teeth pulled. She's on antibiotics preparatory to the surgery, and they aren't agreeing with her. She's a bit off her feed (not necessarily a bad thing, though, as she has put on a pound since last year!). Poor sweetie. Not fun. Mom doesn't like dental work, either.

Last night, I went to see Sergei Eisentein's film, The Battleship Potemkin, at MIllennium Park's Pritzker Pavilion. The Grant Park Symphony played Shostakovich's film score, with the movie projected on a large screen above the stage. I'd love to see them do the same with Alexander Nevsky! Just as the film reached its dramatic ending, the Navy Pier fireworks started going off.

After having finished my book, read the Sunday papers (in which a letter to the editor penned by me was published), and done my Italian homework, I decided to take a run up to Women and Children First Books for a reading by Alison Bechdel (author of the comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For) of her new book, Fun Home. The place was packed with Bechdel's core constituency, and she not only "read" from the book (it's a graphic novel, so she "showed" it, too), but also showed, on her computer, how she wrote/drew it. Very enjoyable. I didn't buy the book, though I might later.

Then I came home and had butternut squash ravioli for dinner and watched Anna Christie.
mojosmom: (japanese icon)
Gorgeous weather today! I got up and went around the apartment throwing open all the windows. A nice change from yesterday's hot, humid and stormy. I was also rather productive today. Aside from the laundry, I got a fair bit accomplished on the book I'm working on for submission to the One Book, Many Interpretations show. I also painted the rusty planter that I have on the back porch. I've been intending to do it for a while, but with the weather as nice as it was, and the forecast for the next couple of days also good (i.e. no rain), it was the perfect day for it.

Around 11 a.m., I went downstairs to watch the neighborhood Fourth of July parade go down the street. The usual politicians dressed as Betsy Ross, the Statue of Liberty and Uncle Sam, and the usual bagpipers, horses, school bands, kids on bikes, anti-Bush posters, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. I took a bunch of pictures and, having now finished the roll, will post them on Flickr as soon as I get the CD/prints back.

Late this afternoon, I traipsed out to the south suburbs because the husband of a friend was having a birthday. His brother came in from Indiana bringing his grill with him. And, oh, what a grill! It's nicknamed "The Enterprise", has a grilling surface approximately 4' x 5', a chimney to adjust the smoke, and all sorts of other stuff. He made it himself. He'll make you one for a mere $325. Judging from the barbecue we had, it's an excellent grill! Even aside from the food, the party was fun. Nice mix of folks, good conversation.

This was, as usual, the second Fourth of July, the first being on the Second of July, as that's the day Waukegan had their parade. I went up there to join my friends at the parade and then for dinner at Julie's (the traditional hamburgers, brats, potato salad, corn on the cob and watermelon). Unfortunately, I forgot my camera, so no pics.
mojosmom: (My House)
Redecorating )

Fresh Air )

That seminar mentioned above )

Oh, by the way, I have not forgotten about the photo meme. Pictures are slowly but surely being taken, and I hope to have the roll of film used up over this weekend so I can get it developed and pictures posted by mid-week.

Okay, back to housework.

Pics!

May. 16th, 2006 11:18 am
mojosmom: (busy bee)
I got my New Orleans photos developed, and got a CD as well as prints. So most of them (some didn't come out too well) are now on Flickr, along with some new ones of the cats and a few of my binding projects.

Jazz Fest

Cats

Bookbinding Projects

Pics!

May. 16th, 2006 11:18 am
mojosmom: (busy bee)
I got my New Orleans photos developed, and got a CD as well as prints. So most of them (some didn't come out too well) are now on Flickr, along with some new ones of the cats and a few of my binding projects.

Jazz Fest

Cats

Bookbinding Projects
mojosmom: (CHB)
five of them, anyway.

I've just signed up for Letterpress I )

I've wanted to take this class for quite a while, but it was always offered on a weeknight when I had a conflict. So when I saw Saturday, I signed up immediately! I'm a bit worried though; this sort of thing can be very addictive. ;-))
mojosmom: (CHB)
five of them, anyway.

I've just signed up for Letterpress I )

I've wanted to take this class for quite a while, but it was always offered on a weeknight when I had a conflict. So when I saw Saturday, I signed up immediately! I'm a bit worried though; this sort of thing can be very addictive. ;-))
mojosmom: (CHB)
The Chicago Hand Bookbinders meeting was at the Harold Washington Library, Special Collections, this evening. We were shown a variety of examples from their holdings. They're strong in Chicago theatre, and Civil War materials, as well as neighborhood history. They'd just gotten in some working scripts from Scott McPherson's Marvin's Room; it made me sad to see them.

Then we adjourned to the conservation lab, which Lesa is in the process of improving. She did a tooling demo.

She said that they are getting a tremendous response to the One Book, Many Interpretations call for entries (See this journal entry). I told her to assign me whatever book she needed done. I rightly guessed that To Kill a Mockingbird was at the top of most of the lists.

I came home to find a box from Bookcloseouts.com. Two pop-ups, two Dorothy L. Sayers books that have been on my Wish List, and two books about books. A nice haul.

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