mojosmom: (Default)
Figured I'd better blog about Glasgow and Dublin before I head off to New Orleans this evening!

Both trans-Atlantic flights were alleged to be "very full", but I was able to get a four-across row with no other passengers on each. This was especially good on the flight over, as I could stretch out a bit (despite armrests that don't go all the way up - why do they do this?) and nap.

Glasgow )

Dublin )

Was able to pre-clear customs at Dublin Airport, which saved time at O'Hare, and Lilith and I were very happy to see each other again.
mojosmom: (Default)
Figured I'd better blog about Glasgow and Dublin before I head off to New Orleans this evening!

Both trans-Atlantic flights were alleged to be "very full", but I was able to get a four-across row with no other passengers on each. This was especially good on the flight over, as I could stretch out a bit (despite armrests that don't go all the way up - why do they do this?) and nap.

Glasgow )

Dublin )

Was able to pre-clear customs at Dublin Airport, which saved time at O'Hare, and Lilith and I were very happy to see each other again.
mojosmom: (japanese icon)
I have just come in from clearing a few inches of snow off the car. It's supposed to snow all night, and since I have a class in the morning, I wanted to get a head start. A friend of mine is supposed to be flying in from New York tonight to see her mom and her two kids (I say "kids", but they are college grads); I hope she makes it.

Hard to believe it was 50º(F) yesterday! (Well, maybe not. This is Chicago, and it is January.

It's been a fairly quiet week. I ushered at a concert on Saturday - very nice early music, featuring a pair of cellists. Went to hear The Magic Flute last night, which is always a treat. Also went to an event at the Art Institute - a conversation between a curator and a collector, followed by drinks, noshes and a viewing of an exhibit of drawings from said collector's collection. There was one piece in particular that I coveted, "Second Roebling", by Christopher Wilmarth. I won't post the image of it that I found on the web, though; it just doesn't do the piece any justice.

Did a bit of shopping. I lost my good black gloves on the bus on Friday, so had to replace them. I was really annoyed because I'd only bought them a few weeks ago. Also did some boring but necessary bra/undies/socks shopping.

I went to the library yesterday to return one book, and pick up another that was on hold. I actually returned home with four books; it's so nice to have the time to sit back and read.

I finally worked out exactly when I'm going to head off to the BC convention. I'm going to go to Glasgow first, and then Dublin. I bought my airline tickets today and booked a hotel in Glasgow, and am waiting to hear from someone who might share a room in Dublin before I book that (though I'm not going to wait too long). I had to change a couple of theatre tickets here, but that was no big deal.
mojosmom: (Default)
I had a marvelous time in Washington!

Thursday )

Friday )

Saturday )

Sunday )

Monday )

That cold I brought home with me was dreadful. I usually kick a cold within a few days, but it was still hanging on at the end of the week, despite cold meds and swilling of orange juice and chicken soup, so I went to the clinic on Saturday and left with five different meds. I spent all day Sunday and Monday in bed, missing work and class on Monday, but by Tuesday was actually feeling human again, and was pretty much completely back to normal on Wednesday. I hate being sick!
mojosmom: (D.C.)
We were chatting at Italian class tonight, and one of my classmates, who makes gorgeous jewelry, mentioned that she was going to be exhibiting at a show in D.C. in April. So I said, "Quando in Aprile?" And it turns out that it is going to be at the same time as the BookCrossing Convention! And it's not just any show, it's the Smithsonian Craft Show. (The show is at the National Building Museum, which is worth a visit all on its own.)

Charleston

Oct. 20th, 2008 09:13 pm
mojosmom: (Default)
What a beautiful city Charleston is! A dream for someone like me who loves to walk, and loves history and architecture. And the Charleston Bookcrossers are a great bunch of folks. The early arrivals went out Thursday night for fish and chips, drinks, and a good time, but we were up betimes to head for breakfast on Friday. [livejournal.com profile] inkognitoh, [livejournal.com profile] kiptrix, Solittletime and I went on a fascinating bus tour, by Gullah Tours. Our guide, Alphonso Brown, has also written a guidebook, which I bought and put to good use later on. We visited the forge of Philip Simmons, who has done many beautiful wrought iron gates around Charleston:
Forge
Then we went to a book sale:
At the Book Sale

Friday night was the Meet & Greet. Among the many celebrities attending were Bruce:
Quiet Scott,
Bumma and Skyring:
Bumma and Skyring
A good time was had by all.

Saturday we gathered at the Marion Square Farmers' Market to release books:
Fountain release - Marion Square
Fortunately, we had a lot of release bags, because it rained, but not before we had plenty of time to wander about, admiring the produce and eating beignets, crêpes and other goodies. Some of us ducked into the Starbucks across the street and waited out the rain. I walked around a bit, shopped for gifts at the City Market
City Market - ceiling and then went back to the hotel to rest up for Trivia Night, which was also tremendous fun.

On Sunday, I went to Mass. Really I did. [livejournal.com profile] bookczuk and [livejournal.com profile] javaczuk sing in the choir of the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist, which is why I went. The building is still standing. ;-)) Some folks went off to brunch afterwards, but I wanted to wander, so czukie directed me to a couple of nearby cemeteries. The Unitarian Church in Charleston and St. John's Lutheran are next door to each other, and their graveyards adjoin. It's very interesting to compare the two:
Unitarian graveyard with bench for contemplation
and
St. John's Lutheran Church graveyard

I went to the Gibbes Museum, particularly to see the exhibit, Grass Roots: African Origins of an American Art, about basket weaving, with some stunning examples of the work. A local sweetgrass sewer, Mary Jackson, just won a MacArthur "genius grant".

From there, I proceeded to walk around the historic district, guidebooks in one hand, camera in the other. After a while, it started to rain again, and my phone rang. It was czukie, offering to kidnap me and get me out of the rain, so of course I accepted. We went off to Folly Beach and thence to the czuk homestead for crab cakes and company.

Then Monday came and I had to leave! Waaaahhhh!!!! Skyring and I shared a cab to the airport, and then I sat around and sat around as my flight was way late leaving. Despite the fact that I was assured I'd get to Atlanta in time to make my 2:35 connection, that didn't happen. I think I got off one plane just as the other was taking off. Delta re-booked me on a 4:00 flight that, in the event, didn't leave until about 5:30. But I eventually did get home, and the cats were happy to see me, and I to see them.
mojosmom: (travel)
I'm leaving in a few minutes to catch my plane, and won't be back until Monday afternoon. I'm so excited to finally be meeting this great bunch of Bookcrossers. My goal is to return with fewer books than I'm taking. I probably won't be posting while I'm away, but will report on my return - with pictures!
mojosmom: (travel)
Sometimes it's good you don't know about something. If I'd known about this, I'd probably have gone to NYC this week to relive my misspent youth, and missed [livejournal.com profile] futurecatnz's visit!

We had a wonderful time! I picked FutureCat up at O'Hare Wednesday evening. As usual, I got there well ahead of schedule, so I had a drink at the bar and then hung out in the arrivals area people watching. Of course, I recognized her immediately, if only because no one else was wearing a BookCrossing t-shirt! We headed home, with a brief stop at the produce market, and I introduced her to my cats. Lilith, as usual, was happy to have another cat person in the house to admire her. Marissa, also as usual, performed a disappearing act. I passed on to FC the books [livejournal.com profile] texaswren had sent on, and also this book, which was on hand at the Evanston Meet-Up earlier in the week, and which I immediately knew I had to grab for her. We sampled some Spanish pastries, she had brought me, and then it was (relatively) early to bed because FC was pretty tired after her long flight.

After breakfast the next day, we went out and our first mission was to purchase a prepaid phone, as the one FC bought in Singapore did not work here, contrary to what she had been told. I blushed for my fellow Americans as the sales woman at Radio Shack said, as she was registering the phone, "Where did you say you were from? New England?" Their computer system was completely unable to deal with non-U.S. postal codes or telephone country codes, so we ended up giving her my address instead. After settling that, I showed FutureCat the University of Chicago campus, including a brief visit to the Oriental Institute, an exterior tour of Robie House (docented by me), and a few other notable spots, the Seminary Co-op Bookstore among them. Sadly, when we went into Rockefeller Chapel, we found that the glorious rose window was hiding behind construction barriers. (This will be a theme.)

After a brief rest back at my place, we gathered books and selves together. Before heading downtown, we went to the Dixie Kitchen and Bait Shop for lunch, and I think Cajun cooking has another fan from the Antipodes (Skyring is another after his visit last year!). Our first stop was the Cultural Center, as I think it is one of the most beautiful buildings we have here, particularly Preston Bradley Hall's stunning stained glass dome - which was in restauro and therefore not visible! Next stop, Macy's on State Street. Yes, [livejournal.com profile] mojosmom went into Macy's, but only because FC had a Levenger's gift card burning a hole in her pocket, and I know better than to stand between a book lover and Levenger's! We then headed to Millennium Park, and FC released a couple of books on the way (not in Millennium Park - security doesn't like that!):
Traveling Book

After seeing the Gehry and the Bean and the Lurie Gardens and and and, we went to the Art Institute (which is right across the street). We visited the French Impressionists
FutureCat & Seurat
and a number of other galleries, and after a bit our feet were a tired, so we had a respite and a cup of tea in the Member's Lounge. (This is another excellent reason for Chicagoans to become members of the AIOC!) FutureCat wondered if there was any Native American art at the AIOC, so we checked the floor plan, found that we needed to go to Gallery 50, and headed that way, only to discover that it was "closed for reinstallation"! (I told you this would be a theme!)

It was, in any case, about time to head to Cosí's, where we hoped to meet up with some other Chicago Bookcrossers. They also have free WiFi, but, for some reason, FutureCat's laptop didn't cooperate. In the event, only one other person came, Koolmotor, but we had a good deal of fun nonetheless.
FutureCat and Koolmotor
We traded off a bunch of books (surprise!) and FutureCat showed us New Zealand's Convention presentation. I really, really want to go, and I'm hoping (without too much optimism) that the dollar will be stronger this time next year, and that I can manage sufficient time off to make it worth the (very long) trip.

This morning, we got up very early, as FutureCat had a 9:00 flight to Ottawa and, as that's an international flight, had to be at O'Hare two hours ahead of time (probably not really necessary, but better to be early at the airport than to be worrying about missing the plane). I left a bit of extra time as there is a variety of road construction going on, but traffic wasn't too bad at all. I was sorry that FutureCat's visit wasn't longer, it was such fun having her and learning much I didn't know about her country. I advise everyone that if the opportunity arises to host a fellow BookCrosser, do it!
mojosmom: (Default)
#40
The Amazing Mackerel Pudding Plan: Classic Diet Recipe Cards from the 1970s, by Wendy McClure

I was out and about today (see below), and found this book. The minute I saw it, I knew it was the perfect birthday present for my sister, who has acres of cookbooks, including some rather retro ones. This is not actually a cookbook, but a collection of Weight Watchers® Recipe Cards with comments by the author. (Cucumber "Cream" Salad: "You know, I don't think I want to know why the cream is in quotes." The pictures have that weird coloring that food photography had some 30 years ago, along with some very odd choices of props. For some reason, the Mexican Shrimp-Orange Salad is surrounded by ceramic bell peppers, cats and a frog.

Despite the spoilsports on BC who think you should never read a book that you are giving to someone else, I read it, and it's extremely mirth-making.

I would like to share with you one lovely photograph of a delightful-sounding dish. However, if you are eating or drinking anything, please swallow now. Also, if you have anything breakable in your hand, it might be wise to put it down. I have given fair warning, and will not be responsible for the consequences if you do not heed this advice. Herewith, I give you Crown Roast of Frankfurters!

The rest of my day

After a couple of errands this morning, I walked over to the 57th Street Art Fair, a venerable Hyde Park institution to which I have been going ever since my parents took me as a child. Established 59 years ago, it is the first juried fair in Chicago. Like all such, there are some fabulous artists, some real schlock, and a lot in between. I always think that the photography and the crafts tend to be the best. There were some stunning woodworking (I especially loved this work) and some beautiful (but expensive) textiles.

There's also a community art fair adjacent to this one, and there I did buy a couple of things. One was a scarf, a sheer bright orangey-yellow, with bits of turquoise, yellow, gold, light green and red floating in it. At intervals, there are thicker lines of green/yellow with loops. It's hard to describe, but it's very nice. I was looking and looking at it, and asked the price, sure that it would be too much. "$10", she said! "You're kidding!!!", I replied. And bought it. Now, if you had told me that I would buy a tissue box cover, I'd have said you were nuts. But I did. It's a piece of fabric that wraps around the box and fastens with two pretty little brass buttons, like knots of rope. The fabric is dark brown ultrasuede, but in the middle there is a wide strip of soft leather in a lighter brown, with calligraphy on it (don't know whether it's Japanese or Chinese). Really elegant.

The main fair is on the grounds of an elementary school and the PTA (Parent-Teacher Association for you non-U.S. types) has a food fair every year. Various local food merchants have booths, too. So I had a yummy, if messy, pulled pork sandwich for lunch. The school was also promoting their Latin program! Yes, kiddies, Latin in the second grade in the Chicago Public Schools. They were selling cards designed by the kids and mugs and stuff, so I got some cards for my sister who studied Latin in high school. There were a couple of the students there who were telling people about the program and were wildly enthusiastic! Nice to see!

I confess that, being on 57th Street, I went to bookstores. It's a failing, what can I say? I try hard to conquer my addiction, but it's too strong. I found a book by Blue Balliett, of Chasing Vermeer fame, from before she had fame, indeed, from before she lived in Chicago. It's The Ghosts of Nantucket: 23 True Accounts. I also found a book that is going to a certain BCer, so will say no more about that one, as it's a surprise. At Powell's, I became completely hysterical over Queer Pulp: Perverted Passions from the Golden Age of the Paperback. Did you know that Lawrence Block, the mystery writer, wrote lesbian pulp fiction, including a book that glories in the title "69 Barrow Street"? Bought that and a couple of other things. And while it wasn't quite at the level that always happens to [livejournal.com profile] annulla, I did stumble across a couple of boxes labeled "Yours for the Taking", so I took - a Dramatists Play Service edition of Lillian Hellman's Watch on the Rhine to read and release, and a book called The Gospel in Art by the Peasants of Solentiname. About Solentiname.

I took some photos at the fair, and was thinking about going to the Wooded Island to take some more, but my bag was getting rather heavy with books and such, so I came home!

Tomorrow, Printers Row Book Fair!
mojosmom: (busy bee)
The weather was absolutely perfect today. Warm and sunny, with a soft lake breeze. Just gorgeous.

I took Marissa to the vet as she's been having the occasional wheezing sort of cough. The vet says she's probably allergic to something, and advises using a non-dusty litter. But she's otherwise quite healthy and the vet says it's nothing to worry about. Then I came home and did a bit of ironing and got some books ready to release.

Shortly before noon, I hopped a bus downtown. First stop: the Chicago Architecture Foundation. I was just going to browse their shop, but I got distracted by an amazing exhibit in the Atrium, the The Newhouse Architecture Competiton )

There was some amazing work from some truly talented kids.

Then I wandered over to the Palmer House Hilton, scoped out the hot men and released some books: Blood, Snow and Classic Cars, Flesh and the Word, and Love, Sal.

The old Shubert Theatre has been bought and renovated and is now the LaSalle Bank Theatre. They had an open house today, which was one of my purposes in going downtown. So after leaving the Palmer House, I went down Monroe, dodged through the Memorial Day parade on State Street, and checked it out. They've done a great job of restoration on the theatre. It's really beautiful, and the seats are 3" wider now! I took a bunch of photos, released a book, nibbled on cookies, ran into a friend, and won a CD of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee in the raffle.

With some time to kill before my next destination, I wandered into a few stores on State Street. I found a lovely blouse (on sale) at Urban Outfitters and a decorative pillow (on sale) at Nordstrom Rack. Wandered into Dick Blick's and got handed a free sample of colored pencils (and picked up their list of upcoming demos - Lineco is doing a bookbinding one in late June - must try to get to it.) Browsed a bit at Border's.

On to the Gene Siskel Film Center for a showing of a selection of shorts in their "Treasures from the Library of Congress" series. My favorite was Jammin' the Blues, with folks like Lester Young and Illinois Jacquet just, well, jammin'. The photography was stunning, especially the shots of Young on tenor sax, cigarette between his fingers, smoke drifting up. And an equally smoky vocal of "On the Sunny Side of the Street" by Marie Bryant. Sublime. And on to ridiculous - one of the great cartoons of all time, What's Opera, Doc?. There were brief pre-showing talks by a couple of folks from the LOC, as well as a Q&A afterwards. I was pleasantly surprised to discover that there was a reception afterwards, with food! So I had an unexpected late-afternoon snack of veggies, fruit, and sweets. Very nicely done, Film Center! While I was there, I picked up next month's schedule - a Janet Gaynor fest! I may have to stop in.

Then I came home, fed the cats, checked the mail, ate dinner, put the summer linens on the bed, and now I'm here telling you all about my day.

Last night, I went to the Center for Book and Paper Arts for the opening of their Residency exhibition. Lots of good stuff, but I was especially taken by a piece by Mary Hood, "Earth, Air, Water, Fire", consisting of four scented books. What was unusual was that looking at them, they appeared, depending on how they were presented, to be slipcased or in drop-spine boxes. But what seemed to be the case or the box were, in fact, the covers of the books. Beautifully executed. Lots of chat with Bill Drendel and Anita, and I met a couple of people who are new to the Center. Very nice noshes, too.

Thursday was a reception at the Newberry for the Newberry Consort. They have started doing these "end of season" receptions for subscribers, which I think is very nice. A preview of next season, the opportunity to chat with the musicians, and food (the invitation said "wine and cheese"; this was true, but there were also little bagels, smoked salmon and the usual accoutrements, veggies, fruit, and chocolate-covered strawberries). The news is that next season will be Mary Springfels' last as director. She's 60, her partner's now in New Mexico, and, after twenty-one years leading the Consort, she wants to move on to other things. She'll still sit in occasionally, which is good.

The rest of the holiday weekend promises to have just as lovely weather as today. I think I'll try to get to the Art Institute Monday, as I haven't been there in a while. Tomorrow I may just veg on the back porch with the Sunday papers.

Oh! The swans that live in the retention pond at my office have cygnets! I tried to get photos, but they were lurking in the reeds, so I got a shot of dad instead. Story on myself: cameras are not allowed in the building, but I had slipped mine in my bag and forgotten I had it until I said to someone, "since I have my camera, I think I'll try to get pictures of the swans". What's really silly is that, just the night before, I'd been telling someone that I could never have a camera phone because I couldn't bring it into the office. Don't know where my head was!

Whodunit?

May. 24th, 2006 12:13 am
mojosmom: (Default)
I came home today to find a "Rush to" packet from the Bookcrossing Supply Store. It contained the "Panda Reading" bookplates that were on show at the Convention, but haven't been released yet. No packing slip, no note.

Will somebody please 'fess up??

Whodunit?

May. 24th, 2006 12:13 am
mojosmom: (Default)
I came home today to find a "Rush to" packet from the Bookcrossing Supply Store. It contained the "Panda Reading" bookplates that were on show at the Convention, but haven't been released yet. No packing slip, no note.

Will somebody please 'fess up??
mojosmom: (Steinlen cats)
I had dinner with [livejournal.com profile] tzurriz last night, and then spent some time with her and [livejournal.com profile] jfroebe and their cats. And Tzurriz gave me a laser toy for my cats! They love it, I think. Either that, or it's driving them batty (or should I say, battier). I also picked up the box of books Tzurriz & Jason so kindly drove back for me from Toronto (I was flying and couldn't carry them all!), so all the books I got at Convention are now journaled.
mojosmom: (Black cat)
These Canadians don't kid around about breakfast. We had a breakfast buffet that could have served to last all day. Gorgeous pastries and back bacon and fruit and potatoes and eggs and other good stuff.

The first presentation was AwesomeAud (who was also my roomie) talking about Book Repair. Despite having lost most of her voice (she regained it a bit into her presentation), she did a great job. She kept things simple, and accompanied her speech with diagrams as well as showing examples of books she had repaired.

This was followed by [livejournal.com profile] whytraven on "BookCrossing & Your Life" (wait, BookCrossing is our life, isn't it?). Seriously, it was quite an interesting discussion of how to incorporate the two.

Then author Judith Robinson talked about her book on evangelist Aimée Semple McPherson. McPherson was a unique character, a celebrity healer and preacher, about whom the breath of scandal hovered. I thought, though, that Robinson got a bit too enamored of her subject to cast an appropriately skeptical eye.

After a refreshment break (more yummy food - gosh, they did us well in this department!), we had speakers from the Canadian Book and Periodical Council, a sponsor of the Freedom to Read Week (as part of which their Freedom of Expression Committee joined with Bookcrossing in a "Free a Challenged Book" release program). Some of the stories they told were pretty scary!

Then we voted to have the 2008 Convention in England - so start saving your pennies!

It was sad to leave everyone; I had such a good time! But after a bite to eat with Sonora and Voyager at a Tim Horton's, we headed for the airport and home. It was nice to see the cats again. ;-))
mojosmom: (Black cat)
These Canadians don't kid around about breakfast. We had a breakfast buffet that could have served to last all day. Gorgeous pastries and back bacon and fruit and potatoes and eggs and other good stuff.

The first presentation was AwesomeAud (who was also my roomie) talking about Book Repair. Despite having lost most of her voice (she regained it a bit into her presentation), she did a great job. She kept things simple, and accompanied her speech with diagrams as well as showing examples of books she had repaired.

This was followed by [livejournal.com profile] whytraven on "BookCrossing & Your Life" (wait, BookCrossing is our life, isn't it?). Seriously, it was quite an interesting discussion of how to incorporate the two.

Then author Judith Robinson talked about her book on evangelist Aimée Semple McPherson. McPherson was a unique character, a celebrity healer and preacher, about whom the breath of scandal hovered. I thought, though, that Robinson got a bit too enamored of her subject to cast an appropriately skeptical eye.

After a refreshment break (more yummy food - gosh, they did us well in this department!), we had speakers from the Canadian Book and Periodical Council, a sponsor of the Freedom to Read Week (as part of which their Freedom of Expression Committee joined with Bookcrossing in a "Free a Challenged Book" release program). Some of the stories they told were pretty scary!

Then we voted to have the 2008 Convention in England - so start saving your pennies!

It was sad to leave everyone; I had such a good time! But after a bite to eat with Sonora and Voyager at a Tim Horton's, we headed for the airport and home. It was nice to see the cats again. ;-))
mojosmom: (Librarian books)
Woke up a tad late on Saturday, but managed to shower, dress and grab a cup of tea and a scone at the corner coffee shop before the first session, which was Founder's Hour. Heather and Bruce talked a bit about what's going on with the site and the efforts to finance it through other ventures.

Then Ottawabill talked about his mass releasing adventures, how to organize them, how to label the books, how to pick up police officers in the process, etc. He's a card, that one. I understand he is taking his show on the road to the Charleston Convention, so you'll have another chance!

Toronto Globe and Mail journalist John Allemang then talked about his "Book-a-Day" project. Well, not really - four books a week is more technically correct, but, as he pointed out, doesn't have quite the same ring to it! He reads and reviews them for the paper. He talked about how he chooses the book, how it affects his reading habits, etc. Here's an article about it )

After a very nice lunch, we heard writer Warren Dunford, author of Soon to be a Major Motion Picture, Making a Killing and (his latest) The Scene Stealer, all mysteries set in Toronto. I've read the first two, and enjoyed them very much, and am looking forward to reading the third. He's an excellent reader, which isn't always the case with authors.

After that, some folks did a reverse scavenger hunt, though others were, I think, deterred by the wet stuff coming down from the skies. I skipped it because I wanted to go to the Royal Ontario Museum. Much of it is closed due to construction and renovation work, but I got to see the Deco Lalique exhibit, which was fabulous, as well as their excellent collection of art deco furniture. I also, of course, visited the Asian galleries. The building is worth a visit all by itself: check out this photo of the rotunda - http://www.answers.com/topic/royal-ontario-museum

Then I walked over to the Toronto Reference Library to see an exhibit honoring a local opera company's 20th anniversary season. Opera Atelier specializes in 17th- and 18th-century opera, and the exhibit was dedicated to set, costume and prop design over their history. It was delightful. And it's not my fault that the library's used bookstore is right next to the gallery where the exhibition was mounted. ;-))

Rested up a bit at the hotel, and then we were off to the Churchmouse and Firkin for dinner. About 50 Bookcrossers took over their upstairs, and crowded into a bunch of tables and booths. Lively discussion and much eating and drinking ensued, and a good time was had by all. A few of us stopped at Baskin-Robbins on the way back for an ice cream.

Tune in later for the report on Sunday!
mojosmom: (Librarian books)
Woke up a tad late on Saturday, but managed to shower, dress and grab a cup of tea and a scone at the corner coffee shop before the first session, which was Founder's Hour. Heather and Bruce talked a bit about what's going on with the site and the efforts to finance it through other ventures.

Then Ottawabill talked about his mass releasing adventures, how to organize them, how to label the books, how to pick up police officers in the process, etc. He's a card, that one. I understand he is taking his show on the road to the Charleston Convention, so you'll have another chance!

Toronto Globe and Mail journalist John Allemang then talked about his "Book-a-Day" project. Well, not really - four books a week is more technically correct, but, as he pointed out, doesn't have quite the same ring to it! He reads and reviews them for the paper. He talked about how he chooses the book, how it affects his reading habits, etc. Here's an article about it )

After a very nice lunch, we heard writer Warren Dunford, author of Soon to be a Major Motion Picture, Making a Killing and (his latest) The Scene Stealer, all mysteries set in Toronto. I've read the first two, and enjoyed them very much, and am looking forward to reading the third. He's an excellent reader, which isn't always the case with authors.

After that, some folks did a reverse scavenger hunt, though others were, I think, deterred by the wet stuff coming down from the skies. I skipped it because I wanted to go to the Royal Ontario Museum. Much of it is closed due to construction and renovation work, but I got to see the Deco Lalique exhibit, which was fabulous, as well as their excellent collection of art deco furniture. I also, of course, visited the Asian galleries. The building is worth a visit all by itself: check out this photo of the rotunda - http://www.answers.com/topic/royal-ontario-museum

Then I walked over to the Toronto Reference Library to see an exhibit honoring a local opera company's 20th anniversary season. Opera Atelier specializes in 17th- and 18th-century opera, and the exhibit was dedicated to set, costume and prop design over their history. It was delightful. And it's not my fault that the library's used bookstore is right next to the gallery where the exhibition was mounted. ;-))

Rested up a bit at the hotel, and then we were off to the Churchmouse and Firkin for dinner. About 50 Bookcrossers took over their upstairs, and crowded into a bunch of tables and booths. Lively discussion and much eating and drinking ensued, and a good time was had by all. A few of us stopped at Baskin-Robbins on the way back for an ice cream.

Tune in later for the report on Sunday!
mojosmom: (japanese icon)
I had such a lovely time in Toronto. What a beautiful city it is, and the Bookcrossers are beautiful, too! ;-))

After an uneventful flight, I arrived at the hotel around 2:00 on Thursday. Ri had given excellent directions for taking public transport from the airport to the hotel, and I decided to give it a try. Simple, fast and inexpensive. I was to discover that the Toronto public transport system generally is a gem. I hooked up with SerenityBlue and we went to the Bata Shoe Museum (one of the top attractions on my "to be visited" list) and then had tea and pastries at a nearby café. On returning to the hotel, I ran into GoryDetails and Ottawabill, so the three of us headed for dinner and conversation. Later we hooked up with Skyring, Sonora and Voyager, and a couple of other folks for drinks in the hotel bar.

The following day, some folks went to Bookcloseouts. I decided to avoid danger, and so SerenityBlue, Skyring and I went to the Art Gallery of Ontario. We arrived shortly after 10:00, only to discover it didn’t open until noon! So we had a cup of coffee (well, they did, I’d had too much tea at breakfast!) in the cafeteria at the Ontario College of Art & Design which is next door. Then we walked around Chinatown and ducked into an art supply store until the Gallery opened. Unfortunately, their permanent collection was not on display, so after a quick tour of what was there, we went back to the hotel.

That afternoon, I visited the Textile Museum and saw the most amazing exhibit! Bugs! Yes, indeed. Their main exhibit had to do with patterns in textiles, and the bug exhibit was an artist’s use of insects to create patterns similar to those in textiles. It sounds very odd, doesn’t it? But it was gorgeous. All those irridescent carapaces and translucent wings create real beauty. See some images here. Then to the Lillian Smith Library’s Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books to see an exhibit of movable books. (Bill was supposed to join me, but they got sucked in at Bookcloseouts!). Their collection is huge and the exhibit included quite a good variety, from old to contemporary, from pop-ups to tunnel books. And then to The Paper Place (this used to be The Japanese Paper Place, and it was under the auspices of its previous incarnation that I went to Japan).

Earlier, I had made arrangements to meet family for dinner. My cousin George’s first idea was that I should change my travel plans so that I could join them for their big Easter dinner on Sunday. Were it not for having to be at work on Monday and the fees airlines charge for changing tickets, I’d have been tempted. As it was, I skipped the BC Convention opening reception and met them (George & Sophie, their son John and his wife) for dinner at a restaurant near the hotel that is one of their favorite places. It was so very good to see them again (I hadn’t seen them since Cousin Bill’s funeral five years ago), so there was much catching up and family reminiscing along with very good food and drink.

And so to bed (and the hotel bed was very comfortable) . . .
mojosmom: (japanese icon)
I had such a lovely time in Toronto. What a beautiful city it is, and the Bookcrossers are beautiful, too! ;-))

After an uneventful flight, I arrived at the hotel around 2:00 on Thursday. Ri had given excellent directions for taking public transport from the airport to the hotel, and I decided to give it a try. Simple, fast and inexpensive. I was to discover that the Toronto public transport system generally is a gem. I hooked up with SerenityBlue and we went to the Bata Shoe Museum (one of the top attractions on my "to be visited" list) and then had tea and pastries at a nearby café. On returning to the hotel, I ran into GoryDetails and Ottawabill, so the three of us headed for dinner and conversation. Later we hooked up with Skyring, Sonora and Voyager, and a couple of other folks for drinks in the hotel bar.

The following day, some folks went to Bookcloseouts. I decided to avoid danger, and so SerenityBlue, Skyring and I went to the Art Gallery of Ontario. We arrived shortly after 10:00, only to discover it didn’t open until noon! So we had a cup of coffee (well, they did, I’d had too much tea at breakfast!) in the cafeteria at the Ontario College of Art & Design which is next door. Then we walked around Chinatown and ducked into an art supply store until the Gallery opened. Unfortunately, their permanent collection was not on display, so after a quick tour of what was there, we went back to the hotel.

That afternoon, I visited the Textile Museum and saw the most amazing exhibit! Bugs! Yes, indeed. Their main exhibit had to do with patterns in textiles, and the bug exhibit was an artist’s use of insects to create patterns similar to those in textiles. It sounds very odd, doesn’t it? But it was gorgeous. All those irridescent carapaces and translucent wings create real beauty. See some images here. Then to the Lillian Smith Library’s Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books to see an exhibit of movable books. (Bill was supposed to join me, but they got sucked in at Bookcloseouts!). Their collection is huge and the exhibit included quite a good variety, from old to contemporary, from pop-ups to tunnel books. And then to The Paper Place (this used to be The Japanese Paper Place, and it was under the auspices of its previous incarnation that I went to Japan).

Earlier, I had made arrangements to meet family for dinner. My cousin George’s first idea was that I should change my travel plans so that I could join them for their big Easter dinner on Sunday. Were it not for having to be at work on Monday and the fees airlines charge for changing tickets, I’d have been tempted. As it was, I skipped the BC Convention opening reception and met them (George & Sophie, their son John and his wife) for dinner at a restaurant near the hotel that is one of their favorite places. It was so very good to see them again (I hadn’t seen them since Cousin Bill’s funeral five years ago), so there was much catching up and family reminiscing along with very good food and drink.

And so to bed (and the hotel bed was very comfortable) . . .

June 2017

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