mojosmom: (Gautreau)
There was a very interesting lecture/demonstration at the Spertus Institute last night. Fretwork, a consort of viols, did a program on "Jewish Musicians at the Court of Henry VIII". It is believed that some court musicians who came to England from Italy, specifically the Bassano and Lupo families, were, in fact, Jewish, although, if that were the case, they would not have been able to be open about it. You can read more about the speculation here. Whatever their religion, the music was beautiful.

Right now, my mouth hurts. I went to the dentist to have prep work done for a new crown. It didn't take as long as I had expected, for the good reason that what she found under the old crown wasn't as bad as she thought it might be, and so she didn't need to do as much work as she had originally planned.

Now, this building is a block away from my dentist's office, and as I sit in the chair, I have a view of the side of it. Take a look at that picture. I was looking at the upper left-hand diagonal, and noticed something red. Then it moved. There was a maintenance guy (at least that's what I assumed he was) up there! There was a sort of alcove along that edge, and he was leaning out, doing whatever it was needed doing. I was hoping he'd still be up there when I left, so I could get a photo of him - or at least a spot of red! - but he climbed up a ladder and went inside. I got butterflies in my stomach just looking at him! Scary job.

After the dentist, I did a bit of shopping. I picked up a couple of sweaters and a pair of gloves - winter's coming!

Then I went over to the Art Institute to see Chagall's America's Windows, which have just been reinstalled after a five-year absence. They were removed during the construction of the Modern Wing, to avoid damage. They don't officially re-open until Monday, but there are member previews today and this weekend. I'm not sure I like the new location, as it's in a spot where you have to go intentionally. They were previously located at the end of the hallway between the Michigan Avenue Building and the Columbus Street side, so anyone headed that way would see them. But the conservation that was done on them makes the colors just glow,
Right panel, America's Windows
and you can see real subtleties in the work:


There are a ton of things going on this evening, but I'm planning on going to only two of them! More on those when I've been.

Not going to the Farmers' Market tomorrow. It would have been the last outdoor market of the season, but it's been canceled on account of Barack. He's holding a big rally late tomorrow afternoon just a few blocks away, so a lot of stuff at or near the site is being canceled due to security, street closures, etc. Oh, lord, I hope nobody was planning to get married at Rockefeller Chapel tomorrow! They're doomed.
mojosmom: (elections)
At last!

I didn't take the day off from work, so watched the event in our break room. At least Rick Warren was first and over and done with quickly. The one upsetting note in an otherwise glorious day.

Loved Aretha's hat! As TLo described it in their More Inaugural Fashion post, Aretha Franklin in whatever the hell she wants to wear. I liked Jon Carroll's remarks about it (heck, I like this whole column).

The John Williams piece was gorgeous. (I was glad to learn that it was recorded. Poor fingers!) The clarinetist is another Chicago south sider. We're taking over! ;-))

And how cute were Sasha and Malia?

The speech was good, not great. The rhetorician in me kept expecting trilogies that never came: "So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans." "All this we can do. All this we will do." ". . . these things are old. These things are true." These all needed a third thing. "All this we must do. All this we can do. All this we will do." I liked that he included "non-believers", but wish that he had credited Tom Paine properly.

I didn't cry until the Reverend Joseph Lowery's benediction. Just seeing him standing there was so incredibly moving. At that moment, I truly felt the weight of history, seeing him standing on the Capitol steps, bringing to a close the inauguration of the our first African-American president, realizing that he must be looking down the Mall, past the Washington Monument, to the Lincoln Memorial, where, forty-five years earlier, he stood with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. looking towards the Capitol. What he must have been feeling!!

I know that many people missed a lot of what he was saying, missed the fact that he began with words from Lift Ev'ry Voice, the "Negro National Anthem", misunderstood the reference to the bitter saying, "If you're black, get back; if you're brown, stick around; if you're white, you're all right." I had to explain to the twenty- and thirty-somethings in my office who he was, and why I was choked up. I'm sure some of them never even heard of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, that Lowery founded with Dr. King.

I must say that, having read about all the glitches people had getting to, and at, the Inauguration, I'm glad I was sitting in the break room watching!

I also think I had more fun at the Inaugural Ball I attended. Everyone was saying that the balls in Washington have long lines, no food, and no place to sit down. We had lots of passed hors d'œuvres, plenty of tables and chairs, and an open bar, where you could have an "Inaugural on the Baracks" or an "Obamapolitan", among other things.

I decided against the $175 event at McCormick Place, and went to a much less expensive event at the historic Parkway Ballroom. I did wear my "statement jewelry" (which made the local paper).

Here I am, with my date:
Barack and me
(I can't believe they misspelled "Inaugural"! It's correct, though, on the smaller souvenir version of the poster that they were selling.)

More photos.
mojosmom: (elections)
but, dang, I'm tempted by this.
mojosmom: (photos)
Go the 6th page of your flickr account, and post the 6th picture there to your LJ, then tag 6 people who must do the same.

From Grant Park - Barack on the big screen:
Barack on the big screen
mojosmom: (opera)
Send to me by one of my opera group, and madly forwarded by me.
L'Obama, ossia L'Avvento del Messia: Opera in Tre Atti )
mojosmom: (photos)
#s 7 & 8 are a pair.

I found this card in a stall in the ladies' room at the Newberry Library. "I wonder what this is doing here?" I said to myself, seeing this:

Brahms & Liszt

Then I turned it over:

Pissed

The next three are all "I noticed this while waiting for a bus" photos:

#9: Even the bays are fake:

Trompe l'oeil

#10: Street banners

Street banners

#11: Tree stump.
Stump
mojosmom: (elections)
Former Senior Lecturer Barack Obama Elected President of the United States.

“Barack Obama will soon have one of the few titles more impressive than the one he had here,” said Saul Levmore, Dean and William B. Graham Professor of Law.
mojosmom: (elections)
Former Senior Lecturer Barack Obama Elected President of the United States.

“Barack Obama will soon have one of the few titles more impressive than the one he had here,” said Saul Levmore, Dean and William B. Graham Professor of Law.
mojosmom: (elections)
It was a night that I will never forget as long as I live. There we all were, men and women, gay and straight, young and old, abled and disabled, all the colors of the world. We were the "real" America, because we were every segment of American, come together to celebrate an event that, even a few years ago, I would have told you would never happen in my lifetime.

On the Tuesday before the election, I was checking my email from work, and there it was:

YOU ARE

INVITED

llinois supporters are invited to join the Obamas and the Bidens in Chicago for a special Election Night event.

I immediately replied, and was one of the lucky folks to get a ticket, admitting me and a guest:

Election Night Event Ticket

I left work early on Election Day, planning on getting to the event well before the 8:30 start time. (Aside: I stopped by the shoe repair to pick up some shoes, and the woman who works there commented about my being there in the early afternoon. When I told her I'd left work early to go to the rally, she pointed to a pair of freshly-polished men's dress shoes and said, "Those are Obama's shoes!" Then she opined that she hoped he would wear comfortable shoes that evening.) I took the train down to avoid traffic, and joined a host of other folks walking from the Van Buren station to Congress Parkway.

There were two entrances, one for ticketholders and one for non-ticketholders. The lines were just beginning to build, and there were lots of folks with handmade signs asking for a guest ticket. They came from near, and they came from far:
"Need Guest Ticket"

Some ticketholders were selling their guest slots, which I think was truly tacky. I had invited a neighbor who had been waitlisted, but she had managed to get a ticket, so, knowing that there'd be people looking to get in, I had decided that I'd just bring in the first person who asked. That turned out to be a woman from St. Louis, Glen, who had come up on the train with her friend Doris. I couldn't get them both in, but her friend was given a ticket by someone else, so we all went in together. We actually ended up spending the whole evening hanging out, and they were great fun.

In the event, they decided to open the gates much earlier than 8:30. Entry was in three stages. First they checked tickets and photo IDs, and then we waited awhile for them to get the second entry area ready. Then through that, with another ticket & ID check, and finally through the metal detectors, and check of purses and electronics. With the crowd and the wait in each holding area, it took a fair bit of time, but everyone was relaxed and friendly, chatting and making new friends, talking about other rallies we'd attended, work we'd done for the campaign, and our hopes for the night. A woman near us had some leftover Hallowe'en candy and was passing out mini Hershey bars, so we had a bit of sustenance. (Theoretically, no food or drink was allowed in, but "no bag larger than a purse" can cover a multitude of sins!)

And then we entered Hutchinson Field. A lot of folks headed straight for the stage, but the fact is that I didn't want to be in the midst of that crush, and figured I wouldn't see much from that vantage anyway. Glen had recently had knee surgery, was walking with a cane and wasn't feeling too spry, so she decided to go up to the platform that was set up for folks in wheelchairs and otherwise needing assistance, and Doris and I stayed with her. They'd set up a couple of big screens with the CNN feed, so we had a good view, and were near the amenities of food, drink, porta-potties and the Official Obama Store.

There had been much naysaying when the plan was announced. Some people thought it would be a disaster. The weather won't cooperate, there will be too many people, etc., etc. But the weather was utterly gorgeous. I was wearing a lightweight sleeveless sweater and a blazer, and had brought a pashmina if the night turned chilly (as it did, but the shawl was plenty). There were scads of people, but plenty of room, and everyone was cool - no pushing and shoving, no rudeness, but people being helpful and considerate of each other.

So we watched the returns, cheering every bit of good news, booing the occasional bad news. When Ohio was called for Barack, I tried to get my sister on the phone, but she wasn't around. (I talked to her yesterday, and she announced the end of her "I'm not spending money while Bush is in the White House" campaign, which means she will finally get, not only high speed Internet, but a cell phone, which may actually be the most astounding outcome of the election.)

The press, of course, was everywhere. We were interviewed by USA Today, a reporter from Italy, ABC News. Jokingly, whenever a news crew went by, we'd yell, "Over here!" As the returns rolled in, and the electoral votes racked up, the excitement built. And then:
Barack Obama Elected President

I expect they heard the cheers all over the country. I'm not sure that we really believed it could happen, that it would happen. Many, still cynical from the last two "elections", feared until the end that it might be stolen. But it wasn't. There were tears of joy, laughter, and dancing to the sound of Signed, Sealed, Delivered and, natch, Sweet Home, Chicago. Flags were waved. People hugged whoever was nearby, friend, family or stranger. But, no, there were no strangers there, because we were all family in that moment.

This was the nature of the crowd: when John McCain gave his concession speech, he was listened to with attentiveness and respect. He was applauded, his dignity and grace in defeat were given their due. There was no hatred shown, no vindictiveness. The only boos came at the mention of Sarah Palin's name, and those were slight. The general sense was, "Where was this man during the campaign?"

We waited, now a bit impatiently, for Barack's speech. First, as was fitting, we said the Pledge of Allegiance, and Kim Stratton sang the "Star-Spangled Banner". (What is it about that song that singers always mess up the words?) A bishop, whose name I did not catch, gave a deeply moving prayer (and if anyone can find the text or a video clip on the Internet I will be forever grateful). [EDITED to add: [livejournal.com profile] kf_in_georgia located this. Please see her comment below for a link to video of the prayer.] Then he was there, with Michelle, Malia and Sasha. He hugged his family, and then he spoke to us, to the nation, to the world. We listened to history being made:
Hearing History

And then we left, quietly at first, but the celebration spilled into the streets of downtown Chicago. People smiled at each other, and the smiles turned to laughter, and cheers rang out all up and down Michigan Avenue and State Street, and every street. The t-shirt vendors were making out like bandits! By the El tracks, this band was drowning out the trains with their version of FDR's theme song, "Happy Days Are Here Again":
"Happy Days are Here Again"

The rally ended shortly before 11:30. What with the walk to the bus, and the rerouting due to the closure of Lake Shore Drive, I didn't get home until 1:00 a.m. (The city did an amazing job of laying on extra buses; I was really impressed.) To paraphrase a famous statement from the Montgomery bus boycott, "My whole body was tired, but my soul was rested."

It's really difficult to describe, to explain, what this moment means to me. I grew up hearing about the DAR refusing to allow Marian Anderson to sing in their hall. I remember the images of Bull Connor and the dogs and the fire hoses, and I remember four little girls murdered when their church was bombed in Birmingham. I remember the March on Washington, and the one across the Pettus Bridge. I remember the Willis Wagons, that enforced de facto segregation in the Chicago Public Schools, and the rocks thrown at Dr. King in Gage Park by those who opposed fair housing. I guess I was raised right, because I never could understand those things. So to see so many different kinds of people working together to see a skinny guy with a funny name and dark skin elected to the highest office in the land moved me more than I can say. Barack spoke about Ann Nixon Cooper, 106 years old, who lived through years when she could not vote because of both her race and her sex. And this year, a black man and a white woman contended for the Democratic nomination for president. It says so much about the distance we have come as a nation, as a people.

Dr. King said, "Let us march on ballot boxes, march on ballot boxes until race-baiters disappear from the political arena." They haven't disappeared (I don't suppose, human nature being what it is, that they ever will, entirely), but their power is gone, crushed, dissolved. So it isn't so much that we have elected an African-American to the presidency, but the fact that we have done so symbolizes the journey that the United States, the people of the United States, has taken. It is the visible sign that tells us what we've done. To so many young folks, it is the visible sign that they can be, can do, anything. And now, they can believe it.

My heart is so full. I am so proud of all of us.

Yes, We Did!
mojosmom: (elections)
It was a night that I will never forget as long as I live. There we all were, men and women, gay and straight, young and old, abled and disabled, all the colors of the world. We were the "real" America, because we were every segment of American, come together to celebrate an event that, even a few years ago, I would have told you would never happen in my lifetime.

On the Tuesday before the election, I was checking my email from work, and there it was:

YOU ARE

INVITED

llinois supporters are invited to join the Obamas and the Bidens in Chicago for a special Election Night event.

I immediately replied, and was one of the lucky folks to get a ticket, admitting me and a guest:

Election Night Event Ticket

I left work early on Election Day, planning on getting to the event well before the 8:30 start time. (Aside: I stopped by the shoe repair to pick up some shoes, and the woman who works there commented about my being there in the early afternoon. When I told her I'd left work early to go to the rally, she pointed to a pair of freshly-polished men's dress shoes and said, "Those are Obama's shoes!" Then she opined that she hoped he would wear comfortable shoes that evening.) I took the train down to avoid traffic, and joined a host of other folks walking from the Van Buren station to Congress Parkway.

There were two entrances, one for ticketholders and one for non-ticketholders. The lines were just beginning to build, and there were lots of folks with handmade signs asking for a guest ticket. They came from near, and they came from far:
"Need Guest Ticket"

Some ticketholders were selling their guest slots, which I think was truly tacky. I had invited a neighbor who had been waitlisted, but she had managed to get a ticket, so, knowing that there'd be people looking to get in, I had decided that I'd just bring in the first person who asked. That turned out to be a woman from St. Louis, Glen, who had come up on the train with her friend Doris. I couldn't get them both in, but her friend was given a ticket by someone else, so we all went in together. We actually ended up spending the whole evening hanging out, and they were great fun.

In the event, they decided to open the gates much earlier than 8:30. Entry was in three stages. First they checked tickets and photo IDs, and then we waited awhile for them to get the second entry area ready. Then through that, with another ticket & ID check, and finally through the metal detectors, and check of purses and electronics. With the crowd and the wait in each holding area, it took a fair bit of time, but everyone was relaxed and friendly, chatting and making new friends, talking about other rallies we'd attended, work we'd done for the campaign, and our hopes for the night. A woman near us had some leftover Hallowe'en candy and was passing out mini Hershey bars, so we had a bit of sustenance. (Theoretically, no food or drink was allowed in, but "no bag larger than a purse" can cover a multitude of sins!)

And then we entered Hutchinson Field. A lot of folks headed straight for the stage, but the fact is that I didn't want to be in the midst of that crush, and figured I wouldn't see much from that vantage anyway. Glen had recently had knee surgery, was walking with a cane and wasn't feeling too spry, so she decided to go up to the platform that was set up for folks in wheelchairs and otherwise needing assistance, and Doris and I stayed with her. They'd set up a couple of big screens with the CNN feed, so we had a good view, and were near the amenities of food, drink, porta-potties and the Official Obama Store.

There had been much naysaying when the plan was announced. Some people thought it would be a disaster. The weather won't cooperate, there will be too many people, etc., etc. But the weather was utterly gorgeous. I was wearing a lightweight sleeveless sweater and a blazer, and had brought a pashmina if the night turned chilly (as it did, but the shawl was plenty). There were scads of people, but plenty of room, and everyone was cool - no pushing and shoving, no rudeness, but people being helpful and considerate of each other.

So we watched the returns, cheering every bit of good news, booing the occasional bad news. When Ohio was called for Barack, I tried to get my sister on the phone, but she wasn't around. (I talked to her yesterday, and she announced the end of her "I'm not spending money while Bush is in the White House" campaign, which means she will finally get, not only high speed Internet, but a cell phone, which may actually be the most astounding outcome of the election.)

The press, of course, was everywhere. We were interviewed by USA Today, a reporter from Italy, ABC News. Jokingly, whenever a news crew went by, we'd yell, "Over here!" As the returns rolled in, and the electoral votes racked up, the excitement built. And then:
Barack Obama Elected President

I expect they heard the cheers all over the country. I'm not sure that we really believed it could happen, that it would happen. Many, still cynical from the last two "elections", feared until the end that it might be stolen. But it wasn't. There were tears of joy, laughter, and dancing to the sound of Signed, Sealed, Delivered and, natch, Sweet Home, Chicago. Flags were waved. People hugged whoever was nearby, friend, family or stranger. But, no, there were no strangers there, because we were all family in that moment.

This was the nature of the crowd: when John McCain gave his concession speech, he was listened to with attentiveness and respect. He was applauded, his dignity and grace in defeat were given their due. There was no hatred shown, no vindictiveness. The only boos came at the mention of Sarah Palin's name, and those were slight. The general sense was, "Where was this man during the campaign?"

We waited, now a bit impatiently, for Barack's speech. First, as was fitting, we said the Pledge of Allegiance, and Kim Stratton sang the "Star-Spangled Banner". (What is it about that song that singers always mess up the words?) A bishop, whose name I did not catch, gave a deeply moving prayer (and if anyone can find the text or a video clip on the Internet I will be forever grateful). [EDITED to add: [livejournal.com profile] kf_in_georgia located this. Please see her comment below for a link to video of the prayer.] Then he was there, with Michelle, Malia and Sasha. He hugged his family, and then he spoke to us, to the nation, to the world. We listened to history being made:
Hearing History

And then we left, quietly at first, but the celebration spilled into the streets of downtown Chicago. People smiled at each other, and the smiles turned to laughter, and cheers rang out all up and down Michigan Avenue and State Street, and every street. The t-shirt vendors were making out like bandits! By the El tracks, this band was drowning out the trains with their version of FDR's theme song, "Happy Days Are Here Again":
"Happy Days are Here Again"

The rally ended shortly before 11:30. What with the walk to the bus, and the rerouting due to the closure of Lake Shore Drive, I didn't get home until 1:00 a.m. (The city did an amazing job of laying on extra buses; I was really impressed.) To paraphrase a famous statement from the Montgomery bus boycott, "My whole body was tired, but my soul was rested."

It's really difficult to describe, to explain, what this moment means to me. I grew up hearing about the DAR refusing to allow Marian Anderson to sing in their hall. I remember the images of Bull Connor and the dogs and the fire hoses, and I remember four little girls murdered when their church was bombed in Birmingham. I remember the March on Washington, and the one across the Pettus Bridge. I remember the Willis Wagons, that enforced de facto segregation in the Chicago Public Schools, and the rocks thrown at Dr. King in Gage Park by those who opposed fair housing. I guess I was raised right, because I never could understand those things. So to see so many different kinds of people working together to see a skinny guy with a funny name and dark skin elected to the highest office in the land moved me more than I can say. Barack spoke about Ann Nixon Cooper, 106 years old, who lived through years when she could not vote because of both her race and her sex. And this year, a black man and a white woman contended for the Democratic nomination for president. It says so much about the distance we have come as a nation, as a people.

Dr. King said, "Let us march on ballot boxes, march on ballot boxes until race-baiters disappear from the political arena." They haven't disappeared (I don't suppose, human nature being what it is, that they ever will, entirely), but their power is gone, crushed, dissolved. So it isn't so much that we have elected an African-American to the presidency, but the fact that we have done so symbolizes the journey that the United States, the people of the United States, has taken. It is the visible sign that tells us what we've done. To so many young folks, it is the visible sign that they can be, can do, anything. And now, they can believe it.

My heart is so full. I am so proud of all of us.

Yes, We Did!
mojosmom: (elections)
I am exhausted and exhilarated. It was an extraordinary night. Pictures will be uploaded tomorrow evening and a full account rendered. For tonight, just let me say that there was laughing, crying, dancing, hugging of complete strangers, and it was the most well-mannered crowd I've ever seen. And if McCain's campaign had been half as decent as his concession speech, he might not have been giving one.

More to come.

Yes, I did!

Nov. 4th, 2008 11:36 am
mojosmom: (elections)
My polling place is down the street and around the corner from me, so I went over before I went to work. I got there right at 6:00 (when the polls open here) and the line was already out the door and beginning to go down the block. Start to finish it took me an hour and ten minutes to vote, but I still made it to the office in time for court. I've never seen that many people at a polling place. I figure our precinct will be 90%+ for Obama. I'm at work now, but will be leaving in about an hour to go home, run a few errands and then head downtown for the rally.

I wish we got stickers instead of those paper receipts, though. I always liked having a sticker to put on my coat.
mojosmom: (elections)
This just may be the funniest thing I've ever seen:


I was particularly amused by the line, "Ain't there no Black Panthers left running around with Obama's name in their Rolodex?". Why? Because the one election he lost was when he tried to unseat former Black Panther, now U.S. Congressman, Bobby Rush.
mojosmom: (elections)
This just may be the funniest thing I've ever seen:


I was particularly amused by the line, "Ain't there no Black Panthers left running around with Obama's name in their Rolodex?". Why? Because the one election he lost was when he tried to unseat former Black Panther, now U.S. Congressman, Bobby Rush.
mojosmom: (Hyde Park)
I decided to go browse some yard sales today. I had three on my list, though it turned out that one was postponed due to "projected storms". I think they were confused because it's a beautiful day! I found a couple of nice quilted storage boxes, the kind that's good for sweaters and the like. I have some similar ones for shoe storage, and really need more, but can't find them anywhere. Mine have a clear plastic cover so you can a) see the shoes, and b) keep the dust out. Really practical; I don't know why no one seems to make them anymore. Also some Pyrex® custard cups that I use for a variety of small items, olives, baby dills, etc. But over the years I've broken all but one, so I was glad to pick up some more. And, as I am one of the few people I know who still wears gloves, I was happy to find a set of plastic glove dryers with a glove case.

One of these was "yard" sales was really an estate sale. Honestly, you go to one of these and you just want to go home and throw stuff out! This was a two-story townhouse with a basement, and I swear the woman had never thrown anything out. There were piles of unopened packages of hose, for instance. On the other hand, it's interesting how much you can learn about someone. She was a devout Catholic, cooked a lot, was a serious seamstress and gardener, and studied languages. She also had small feet and had lots of shoes!

Then there was the sale at the house with the tennis courts. Lots of kids stuff, so not much for me. When I left, the traffic flow and the direction I was parked meant that I had to go around the block to get back to 51st St. So I turned right on 50th, and right on Greenwood, and coming around the corner at 51st was a friggin' tour bus!!! I'm sure the neighbors are thrilled. Lots of squads and undercover cars and guys talking into their shoulders, too. I had figured that Barack was already in Springfield, and so it would be safe to go down his street, but I guess he hadn't left yet.

I stopped by O'Gara & Wilson's. According to their blog, the city is being pissy about the bargain book rack they keepkept on the sidewalk in front of the store, so they had to bring all the books inside. And Alan wrote about a copy of Beowulf illustrated by Lynd Ward for only $1.50! I went by on the chance that no one had snatched it up, but Alan couldn't find it. He's going to keep looking and let me know. There were, apparently, a whole slew of beautiful illustrated books on the bargain rack. He's going to put them in the window, but still at the bargain prices! I did pick up an old book on New Orleans, It's an Old New Orleans Custom, also from the bargain rack.

Now I'm doing boring household stuff like floors and laundry.
mojosmom: (Steinlen cats)
Win or lose, the Obamas are getting a dog after the election. The AKC has come up with a list of purebreds, suggesting the Obamas buy one from a breeder or pet store. But some of us think that the Obamas should visit a shelter, and adopt a homeless dog. (Okay, some of us think it should be a cat, but oh well.) If you think so, too, please sign the petition sponsored by the Best Friends Network here.

While I'm not ordinarily a fan of Internet petitions, two shelter kitties are looking at me with big eyes and suggesting that if I ever want any more snuggles, I'd better not only sign the thing but pass it on. So I am. ;-)

Cat in a shelter cage:
Marissa

Shelter cat with new home:
Sun worshipper

Any questions?
mojosmom: (Steinlen cats)
Win or lose, the Obamas are getting a dog after the election. The AKC has come up with a list of purebreds, suggesting the Obamas buy one from a breeder or pet store. But some of us think that the Obamas should visit a shelter, and adopt a homeless dog. (Okay, some of us think it should be a cat, but oh well.) If you think so, too, please sign the petition sponsored by the Best Friends Network here.

While I'm not ordinarily a fan of Internet petitions, two shelter kitties are looking at me with big eyes and suggesting that if I ever want any more snuggles, I'd better not only sign the thing but pass it on. So I am. ;-)

Cat in a shelter cage:
Marissa

Shelter cat with new home:
Sun worshipper

Any questions?
mojosmom: (Hyde Park)
My Independence Day holiday turned out to be entirely different than the one that I had expected, or vaguely planned. I had thought about going downtown to see the renovated Tiffany Dome at the Cultural Center, and to take in a showing of The Gay Divorcée at the Siskel Film Center. Or, alternatively, I considered going to the opening of A Declaration of Immigration at the National Museum of Mexican Art. In the event, I did neither.

My Fourth - with photos )

I ran into the Ellings and their adorable daughter. They are moving to NYC for a year (or more, depending on how things go and how they like it). They have found a place at 83rd and CPW, and are renting out their condo here. I wonder if they get a higher rent because it used to be Barack's condo!

I think I'll check out the Tiffany dome on Sunday, and maybe go to the Film Center as well. If Visconti's Senso is two hours and starts at 3:00, and Top Hat starts at 5:15, I could see both! Or maybe not. That might just be overdoing things.

Oh, and here are my latest at [livejournal.com profile] croc_sandwich!

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