mojosmom: (Default)
A Chicago cab driver declined a tip. Truly. As I was getting tip money from my purse, he said, "Forget about it." Weird. This was my second interesting cabbie of the day. Earlier, I'd managed to snag a cab as he was depositing an earlier fare. Turns out it was his first day on the job, so we were giving him tips on the best way to get places. Like most Chicago cabbies, he was an immigrant, but I've never had an Uzbekistani cabbie before!

I went to see Luis Alfaro's Oedipus El Rey at Victory Gardens Theatre last Friday, because I know some of the cast members. It got rave reviews, though some friends thought it mediocre. I fall somewhere in between on the play itself (an updating of Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, set in South Central L.A.), but my friends absolutely deserved the accolades they got.

I was planning on going to the DuSable Museum's Art Fair on Saturday, but just as I was getting ready to get in the car and go, the heavens opened and it poured. Not enough to vitiate the drought, but enough to stop me. I went the next day instead. The event always falls on or just before my birthday, so if I see something I really want , I can use the "It's my birthday present to myself" excuse. It's usually jewelry, but this year it was a coat:
New coat

Before going there, I'd been to the home of a friend whose garden is always part of a neighborhood garden walk. On that weekend, she invites people over for cookies and cold drinks, and it's always nice to see her. She'd recently been on an opera tour of Italy, and so I admired her photos and was jealous (she had tried to get me to go with her, but the timing was bad).

It's ridiculously hot today (100º again), and our forthcoming "relief" will be either mid- to upper 80s or mid-to upper 90s, depending on which forecast you believe. Either is too hot to get my walks in, and I'm getting to the point where I think I'll take the bus to Block 37 or Water Tower Place (vertical shopping malls) and walk there. I miss my exercise. Now there's something I never thought I'd be saying!
mojosmom: (Default)
A Chicago cab driver declined a tip. Truly. As I was getting tip money from my purse, he said, "Forget about it." Weird. This was my second interesting cabbie of the day. Earlier, I'd managed to snag a cab as he was depositing an earlier fare. Turns out it was his first day on the job, so we were giving him tips on the best way to get places. Like most Chicago cabbies, he was an immigrant, but I've never had an Uzbekistani cabbie before!

I went to see Luis Alfaro's Oedipus El Rey at Victory Gardens Theatre last Friday, because I know some of the cast members. It got rave reviews, though some friends thought it mediocre. I fall somewhere in between on the play itself (an updating of Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, set in South Central L.A.), but my friends absolutely deserved the accolades they got.

I was planning on going to the DuSable Museum's Art Fair on Saturday, but just as I was getting ready to get in the car and go, the heavens opened and it poured. Not enough to vitiate the drought, but enough to stop me. I went the next day instead. The event always falls on or just before my birthday, so if I see something I really want , I can use the "It's my birthday present to myself" excuse. It's usually jewelry, but this year it was a coat:
New coat

Before going there, I'd been to the home of a friend whose garden is always part of a neighborhood garden walk. On that weekend, she invites people over for cookies and cold drinks, and it's always nice to see her. She'd recently been on an opera tour of Italy, and so I admired her photos and was jealous (she had tried to get me to go with her, but the timing was bad).

It's ridiculously hot today (100º again), and our forthcoming "relief" will be either mid- to upper 80s or mid-to upper 90s, depending on which forecast you believe. Either is too hot to get my walks in, and I'm getting to the point where I think I'll take the bus to Block 37 or Water Tower Place (vertical shopping malls) and walk there. I miss my exercise. Now there's something I never thought I'd be saying!
mojosmom: (Librarian books)
A while back, Bookcrosser Kate Kintail posted about the Association of Writers and Writing Programs conference (http://www.bookcrossing.com/forum/5/6018758). I was tempted, and I fell. Saturday morning, I went down to the Hilton. Oh, my! There were several hundred exhibitors at the Bookfair, and I think I visited them all. See where she says about discounted prices and people shoving things at you? Well, all I can say is that it's a good thing one of the items shoved at me was a tote bag! I came away with lots of books and literary journals, as well as a great many poetry broadsides and catalogues, and had many an enjoyable chat with people. And, as it was Valentine's Day, just about every exhibitor was giving away chocolate:
Chocolate & frisbies

I hauled my books home and rested up, and then went back downtown to meet KK for dinner, at which we talked books and Bookcrossing, of course. I went a bit early, though, as I wanted to stop by Snow Days Chicago. Fortunately, the weather was a bit more cooperative for this event than for last weekend's "Frozen" Fun Fest. I missed the dog sledding, but saw a bit of snowboarding
Wipeout!
and admired the snow sculptures. The one below won First Prize:
A Bug's Life

Yesterday, I went to my monthly cooperative dinner, for which I made roasted fennel and carrots. There were only a few of us, but the food and company were good, and I came home with leftovers.

I'm off work today, and am being lazy. I've done a couple of loads of laundry, though I had to wait to get the sheets off the bed until Lilith decide to get up. Off later to my Italian class.
mojosmom: (photos)
"Big Spirits", by Thomas Schütte. This is at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago:
"Big Spirit", by Thomas Schütte, at the Museum of Contemporary Art

"No Parking"
Parking will be seriously restricted in a wide area around Grant Park and downtown on election night.
Getting ready for 11/4
mojosmom: (frown)
He was 96 years old, had the fullest life of anyone I know, and I'm sitting here bawling like a baby. I guess it's at least in part because I grew up listening to his interviews on WFMT, and the station has never seemed the same since he left it. I can't remember a time when he wasn't a presence in my life, through his radio show, his books, and his readings, that gravelly voice, that laugh both instantly recognizable. He didn't invent oral history, but he sure as heck made it what it is today. He was Chicago, he was Everyman, he was unique.

If there is a God, Studs is interviewing her right now.

Link to Tribune Obit.

Text for posterity )
mojosmom: (Default)
It was nearly 9 o'clock when I woke up this morning. And dark(ish). It was also pouring rain. I resisted the temptation to turn over and go back to sleep, but I did cancel plans to go to the farmers' market! The rain seems to have stopped, at least for the moment, but it's still very wet. So not much outdoor activity today, unless it clears up. But it's not supposed to. Heavy rain is also forecast for tomorrow. There's a half marathon going through Jackson Park tomorrow morning, and I had been thinking about going over and taking some photographs. The race is going to be run "rain or shine"; however, the site also says that "[r]ace officials may cancel, delay or change the race to a non-scored event in case of extreme weather . . ." We'll see. I will say that I am not going to go out in the pouring rain to take photos, and I doubt that many will be "[e]njoy[ing] the wonderful outdoors and music & entertainment as you wait for your family and friends to cross the finish line."

Last night was very arty. I went to the Center for Book & Paper Arts for the closing reception of the 5th International Book & Paper Arts Triennial, which had scads of great work. I then went over to the Fine Arts Building for their Second Friday, a monthly event in which many of the artists who have studios there hold open houses. Pianoforte Chicago has ticketed jazz concerts on these nights. It's well worth going just to see the building, which has been a haven for artists since the late 19th-century. It has fantastic murals, and check out this doorway:
Performers Music

There's also an excellent used bookstore, with a bookstore cat:
Achieve Inner Peace - Read Books

In the "it's a small world" category, I was at one studio and noticed a guy who looked vaguely familiar. He came over and said, "Do you live in Hyde Park?". We discovered that not only do we live a couple of blocks apart, he works in the supermarket where I shop. Didn't recognize him when he wasn't putting out the fresh produce!

At the suggestion of a lot of folks, I downloaded Firefox. I'm not seeing much difference from Safari, but one thing is driving me nuts. The cursor is not the usual vertical line, but is a vertical line with a teeny-tiny horizontal line near the top. I am constantly thinking that it's a speck of dirt on my monitor. Very annoying.

I was going to get up and have another cup of tea, but there's a cat on my lap.
mojosmom: (Default)
Kitty cats:
Lounging about

A bag of books:
Go wild!

My city:
Gateway to Lake Michigan
mojosmom: (travel)
Sometimes it's good you don't know about something. If I'd known about this, I'd probably have gone to NYC this week to relive my misspent youth, and missed [livejournal.com profile] futurecatnz's visit!

We had a wonderful time! I picked FutureCat up at O'Hare Wednesday evening. As usual, I got there well ahead of schedule, so I had a drink at the bar and then hung out in the arrivals area people watching. Of course, I recognized her immediately, if only because no one else was wearing a BookCrossing t-shirt! We headed home, with a brief stop at the produce market, and I introduced her to my cats. Lilith, as usual, was happy to have another cat person in the house to admire her. Marissa, also as usual, performed a disappearing act. I passed on to FC the books [livejournal.com profile] texaswren had sent on, and also this book, which was on hand at the Evanston Meet-Up earlier in the week, and which I immediately knew I had to grab for her. We sampled some Spanish pastries, she had brought me, and then it was (relatively) early to bed because FC was pretty tired after her long flight.

After breakfast the next day, we went out and our first mission was to purchase a prepaid phone, as the one FC bought in Singapore did not work here, contrary to what she had been told. I blushed for my fellow Americans as the sales woman at Radio Shack said, as she was registering the phone, "Where did you say you were from? New England?" Their computer system was completely unable to deal with non-U.S. postal codes or telephone country codes, so we ended up giving her my address instead. After settling that, I showed FutureCat the University of Chicago campus, including a brief visit to the Oriental Institute, an exterior tour of Robie House (docented by me), and a few other notable spots, the Seminary Co-op Bookstore among them. Sadly, when we went into Rockefeller Chapel, we found that the glorious rose window was hiding behind construction barriers. (This will be a theme.)

After a brief rest back at my place, we gathered books and selves together. Before heading downtown, we went to the Dixie Kitchen and Bait Shop for lunch, and I think Cajun cooking has another fan from the Antipodes (Skyring is another after his visit last year!). Our first stop was the Cultural Center, as I think it is one of the most beautiful buildings we have here, particularly Preston Bradley Hall's stunning stained glass dome - which was in restauro and therefore not visible! Next stop, Macy's on State Street. Yes, [livejournal.com profile] mojosmom went into Macy's, but only because FC had a Levenger's gift card burning a hole in her pocket, and I know better than to stand between a book lover and Levenger's! We then headed to Millennium Park, and FC released a couple of books on the way (not in Millennium Park - security doesn't like that!):
Traveling Book

After seeing the Gehry and the Bean and the Lurie Gardens and and and, we went to the Art Institute (which is right across the street). We visited the French Impressionists
FutureCat & Seurat
and a number of other galleries, and after a bit our feet were a tired, so we had a respite and a cup of tea in the Member's Lounge. (This is another excellent reason for Chicagoans to become members of the AIOC!) FutureCat wondered if there was any Native American art at the AIOC, so we checked the floor plan, found that we needed to go to Gallery 50, and headed that way, only to discover that it was "closed for reinstallation"! (I told you this would be a theme!)

It was, in any case, about time to head to Cosí's, where we hoped to meet up with some other Chicago Bookcrossers. They also have free WiFi, but, for some reason, FutureCat's laptop didn't cooperate. In the event, only one other person came, Koolmotor, but we had a good deal of fun nonetheless.
FutureCat and Koolmotor
We traded off a bunch of books (surprise!) and FutureCat showed us New Zealand's Convention presentation. I really, really want to go, and I'm hoping (without too much optimism) that the dollar will be stronger this time next year, and that I can manage sufficient time off to make it worth the (very long) trip.

This morning, we got up very early, as FutureCat had a 9:00 flight to Ottawa and, as that's an international flight, had to be at O'Hare two hours ahead of time (probably not really necessary, but better to be early at the airport than to be worrying about missing the plane). I left a bit of extra time as there is a variety of road construction going on, but traffic wasn't too bad at all. I was sorry that FutureCat's visit wasn't longer, it was such fun having her and learning much I didn't know about her country. I advise everyone that if the opportunity arises to host a fellow BookCrosser, do it!
mojosmom: (Default)
Cross-post from [livejournal.com profile] croc_sandwich
This was a tough one - not due to a dearth of material, but due to too much! I went out to take photos last weekend, and when I got home and started adding descriptions, I realized that just about every building I'd photographed was by Holabird & Roche. As a result, this was going to be a Holabird & Roche-fest, but there were a couple of others I couldn't resist posting, so it's not. But it is all Chicago!

Holabird & Roche )

Not Holabird & Roche )

Other things

Friday night, I went to Cineforum, Casa Italiana's movie night. They were showing De Sica's Umberto D, a 1952 neo-realist film, which I had never seen. It was very good, and generated much discussion afterwards. It's the story of a pensioner, who has no family or real friends, other than his dog, and his struggle to make ends meet in post-war Rome.

Yesterday, I was back at the Newberry Library for David Douglass' discussion of the Consort's last concert (which I mentioned in this post). There was much digression into music theory and notation, which, even for a non-musician such as myself, was really quite interesting. David dropped a bit of information about some of their plans for the next couple of seasons. Among other things, they are going to be dedicating concerts to the memory of musicologist Howard Mayer Brown, the first of which will be Venetian music from Carnevale and Ash Wednesday, as HMB died in Venice at Carnevale.

Last night, I went to the Goodman to see Horton Foote's Talking Pictures. What a marvelous play! Set in Texas in 1929, it deals with the changes wrought by technology and how people cope (or don't cope) with them. The main character, Myra, a divorcée, supports herself and her 14-year-old son by playing piano at the picture show. But with the advent of talkies, her job is threatened and she has to figure that out. The two teen-aged sisters of the family she boards with, Vesta and Katie Belle, are a study in contrasts. Vesta prefers the known, she's the sister you know will "tell" if the other does something outside the norm. Katie Belle, on the other hand, is the one who makes friends with the son of Mexican Baptist preacher (her family is Methodist, so whether it's the "Mexican" or the "Baptist" part that shocks Vesta most isn't certain), sneaks off to the picture show and wants a wider world. The acting was so great that, at the end, when Katie Belle says that she wants to go to Mexico someday, you feel certain that she will.

Goodman is doing a whole Horton Foote Festival, in fact. As part of one of the regular subscription series, they are also doing Trip to Bountiful. But off the series, they are doing an evening of two, one-act plays, and they've offered free tickets to subscribers, so I'm going to that, and also to some other "free to subscriber" events, such as "A Conversation with Horton Foote", with cake and champagne to celebrate his 92nd (!) birthday. But the one I am looking forward to most is a program called "Anatomy of a Trial: To Kill a Mockingbird, the Scottsboro Boys and the Jena 6". They haven't said who will be on the "distinguished panel of historians and social activists", but I'm hoping this will be as interesting a program as it ought to be!

It's hot!

Oct. 7th, 2007 09:30 pm
mojosmom: (Chicago)
I wouldn't mind running around in that fountain. It's October 7, and I went out today in shorts and sandals. For a while there, I seriously considered turning on the air conditioning. I did turn it on in the car when I went out. But at least I'm not crazy. Like those marathon runners. The Chicago Marathon was today, and they ended it early. One man died, and over 300 were sent to hospital, some in critical condition. I understand that these folks have trained and planned for months for this run, but you'd think common sense would prevail.

As usual, the Marathon meant road closures and bus re-routes. So I nixed the thought of going up to the Museum of Contemporary Art. It's their 40th anniversary this year, and they are having "Forty Free Days" with all kinds of events. There was an outdoor concert today in conjunction with the exhibit, "Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967". It would have been fun, but not so much fun that I wanted to deal with the traffic mess. And I can see the exhibit any time.

I also passed on going to the Checkerboard tonight. I was a bit headachey, and while it's not bad, it's such that I didn't think a bar, even a non-smoky one, was the best place to spend the evening.

Yesterday, I was a bit of a busy bee. I went to the Hyde Park-Kenwood Community Conference's book sale in the morning (went again today, and will go tomorrow - they drop the prices each day!), and in the afternoon I went to hear Alice Waters speak (she's promoting a new book, which I didn't buy). I don't know. She seems awfully self-righteous and unaware. I completely agree with her that fast food sucks, and that we need to eat good food, locally-grown. For many people, however, that is easier said than done. Her visit was sponsored by the Green City Market, which I love, but it struck me that GCM is in an area of the city where people can get good produce, and a good variety of it, in their local supermarkets. (And it's not inexpensive either.) There are other, poorer parts of the city where the supermarkets have lousy produce. And the people who shop there do not have the time, money or transportation to go to Yuppie-ville and buy at GCM. Nor is it easy for a single parent working two minimum-wage jobs, living from paycheck to paycheck, to avoid feeding the kids MacDonald's or packaged meals a good part of the time. The problem Waters wants to address is very much intertwined with other problems, but she doesn't seem to recognize that. Edible schoolyards are a lovely thought, but, as I said to my sister, schools will devote time to students growing and cooking their own food when it shows up on standardized testing! She can talk Daley into trying this program at six schools, sure. That's easier for him to do than paying teachers a decent salary, cutting class size, and getting politics out of the schools.

Okay, end of that rant.

So then I went to a reception at the South Side Community Art Center, where my neighbor, a clay artist, is having a show. It's a marvelous show, too. After that, I went to the season's first Newberry Consort concert, The Shakespeare Songbook, all music from, or mentioned in, Shakespeare's plays. The pre-concert lecture by Ross Duffin was really interesting, because he talked about how just a word or phrase in a play referring to a popular ballad would conjure up to the audience a whole world of meaning that we, of course, can't begin to imagine. Made me realize that, however "timeless" we consider his plays, we miss a lot of Shakespeare's meaning because we aren't of his time.

One of the kids on the first floor has acquired a pogo stick! I hear this rhythmic, light pounding sound, and looked outside, and there she was, jumping up and down. Well, there are worse things she could be doing.
mojosmom: (Book sale!)
And "oy!" rightly describes any normal person's reaction to the number of books I brought home from the Newberry Library Book Fair. Thirty-six, plus two duplicates (one of which I've already found a home for) and one book for one of my sisters. Most were a buck or two, though there were a couple that set me back $5-6, and one actually hit double digits. I could barely get the haul back to my car (most of them were hardcovers!). But I did, and got them home and all are now catalogued over at LibraryThing.

On the way to the sale, I passed the old Lyric Opera warehouse, which is being converted to loft condominiums. Now, I take this same route to work everyday, and it's always looked pretty normal. But today, out on one of the balconies being put in, I saw this:

Pale horse, pale rider

When I went back to take the picture, there was a guy working security who approached me and asked if he could help me. We got talking, and he told me the horse & rider were left over after everything had been moved from the warehouse. The developers cleaned it up and put it out on the balcony to create interest. They certainly aroused my interest, though, as I told the guy when he suggested I go to the open house, I'm not in the market for a loft. And I'm sure these will not be cheap.
mojosmom: (cat)
I woke up early this morning and headed to the Lincoln Park Zoo (pictures here). It's not as big or elaborate as Brookfield, but:
a) it's free
b) I can get there on the bus
c) it has a lovely setting, in a park in the middle of the city.

A lot of the animals, especially among the big cats and bears, were "off exhibit", as their habitats are being worked on. (It was pretty amusing to see an area marked "bears", full of homo sapiens!) But there were plenty left to see, and I spent an enjoyable two hours or so watching the animals, human and non-. The Green City Market is just south of the zoo, so I stopped there and bought a few things before I headed home.

Then later I drove up to Waukegan for a performance of Guys and Dolls, Jr. It was put on by a performing arts camp at Waukegan's restored Genesee Theatre. My friend Cheryl's oldest daughter, Jennie Len, had the role of Nicely, Nicely. The kids ranged in age from 9 to 14, and, as you can imagine, their talents ran the gamut as well. There were a couple only a mother could love, most were average but enthusiastic, and another couple were standouts. The girl who played Miss Adelaide could have been a professional. Great voice, great stage presence, a real natural. They cast way against type for Big Juley - the actor was the smallest and youngest girl in the group, and, gosh, did she make a meal of the part!

So all in all, a very enjoyable day.
mojosmom: (Millennium Park)
Leonard Bernstein was a complete and utter genius! My god, talk about your American composers, has there been anyone before or since who could do/has done what he did? I love Copland, Corigliano and a host of others, but just in scope and variety Bernstein has them all beat to hell.

There was the most marvelous concert of his work for Broadway at the Pritzker Pavilion tonight (or should I say, "Tonight, tonight . . ."?). Some of my favorites from Candide and On the Town, stuff from Wonderful Town and West Side Story, little known work from 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue and Peter Pan. It ended with two of my favorite ensemble pieces: "Some Other Time", from On the Town, and "Make Our Garden Grow", from Candide. Beautiful voices, beautiful symphony orchestra, and a beautiful summer night. It was a short concert, only 90 minutes without intermission. I ran into a friend afterwards and we agreed that they could have played all night (oh, wait, that's Lerner and Loewe, isn't it?), and we'd have stayed and listened.
mojosmom: (CHB)
Mostly because I had what I knew would be a long-ish dental appointment in the morning. So I decided to also take my car in for maintenance, visit the Green City Market, and just generally hack around. The weather certainly cooperated; it was glorious.

I dropped the car off first thing, and then got a bus to the dentist. There, I had a cleaning, X-rays, and a stern lecture from the hygienist about coming in more regularly. I was not allowed to leave without scheduling my next appointment! Also had a chat with my dentist about Venice, as I hadn't seen her since I'd been back.

It was my first visit to the Green City Market this year. They had garlic scapes, which I love, so I bought a bunch. Also asparagus, green tomatoes, good bread, a couple of ribeye steaks from Heartland Meat, and a bunch of heirloom sweet peas with the most beautiful aroma. I had a ribeye with mushrooms and garlic scapes, and asparagus, for dinner tonight. Yum.

After picking up the car, I came home to a bit of excitement. One of the little boys who lives across the hall from me had told his mother that he smelled smoke. So everyone was going around sniffing, and the fire department was called. Fortunately, nothing was on fire, and we think that, as we had the hallways painted the day before, he might have been smelling that. Anyway, better safe than sorry!

After some errands, I lazed about, reading a book on the back porch, paying bills, etc. Then I went out to the Chicago Hand Bookbinders meeting, which was at the Adler Planetarium. Taking advantage of the weather, I decided to bring my camera, go early, and wander about the Museum Campus taking pictures. Saw a bunch of cute bunnies, and a predator or two.

As they did with cows and furniture in past years, the city is doing a public art project, this year with globes. But these are political - all about global warming. There are a lot on the museum campus, and they go all along the downtown lakefront. I took a bunch of pictures of these Cool Globes, as the project is called, and expect I'll take more as the summer progresses.

The meeting was grand. Nothing better than looking at old books, old prints and old astronomical instruments. We saw an ephemeris by Maria Cunitia, bound with scrap vellum from a music manuscript, a fifteenth-century astronomical/astrological manuscript with volvelles, a telescope dating from shortly after the invention of telescopes, a very interesting book in which someone re-invented the constellations as biblical and Christian religious personages (which, obviously, never caught on!), and a set of prints juxtaposing the Newtonian view of the universe with the scriptural (or at least scriptural as viewed by the Muggletonian sect). Digression: And a very interesting sect they were, too! While preaching toleration, they themselves were persecuted as dissenters, being anti-Trinitarians. A private gathering at a local inn or tavern with a reading or two from the Bible, and the singing of the "Divine Songs" to traditional tunes over a few beers would be considered a "service", says this source. My kind of church! ;-))

There was a concert at Northerly Island, which messed up the bus routes, so I wound up taking the train home, with Eugenie and a new member who also lives in Hyde Park. (If CHB isn't careful, we'll have a south side branch. ) Eugenie is a most interesting person. It seems we caught our train at the same station at which she and her husband first arrived in Chicago as refugees from Nazi Germany. So she began to reminisce about how they had arrived here in February, having been first in New Orleans, and how they walked, dressed for NOLA, in a Chicago winter, to the station where they had to catch another train. It's a wonder they stayed here! And I can listen to her stories of Chicago bookbinding history forever.
mojosmom: (Flower)
Niki in the Garden - street stenciling
I went to the Garfield Park Conservatory this morning, to see the Niki in the Garden exhibit of monstrous huge sculptures by Niki De St. Phalle. They are amazing! You start out just seeing a big, whimsical-looking person or animal,
Nikigator closeup and then you look closer and see incredible details, like this: La Cabeza - detail with millefiore.

I went a bit crazy taking photographs, not just the sculptures, but flowers and foliage. You can see them all here if you like.

I also found a birthday present for my sister, a cuff bracelet made from vegetable parchment fused to copper, in lovely gold/orange/copper colors.

Then I came home and accomplished much. Cleaned floors, paid bills, did my Italian homework, and had a very nice dinner.
mojosmom: (Millennium Park)
Yesterday, I wore a hat. A navy blue straw hat. I was going to the Art Institute, and decided to go in lady-like style. Blue dress with white flowers, navy blazer, aforesaid hat and navy cotton gloves. Got three compliments on the hat: one from a lady my age, one from a young woman, and one from a guy all dressed in leather (International Mr. Leather is in town)! The event at the Art Institute was a program on The Way of Tea, presented by Shozo Sato. It began with demonstrations of tea ceremony rituals from three different schools, as well as lecture on the way of tea, and one on tea utensils by an American potter who works in Japan with the Urasenke Foundation. I didn't hang around for the tour of the tea utensil exhibit, as I had already seen it.

Today, I went to see the Chicago Opera Theatre's production of Berlioz' Béatrice and Bénédict. They've updated it to the forties, and instead of Berlioz' French dialogue, they went back to Shakespeare, so it's French singing and English dialogue. The updating is logical and works very well.

The weather today was absolutely gorgeous, warmer than forecast. The opera was at the Harris Theatre of Music and Dance, right by Millennium Park, so as it was still warm and sunny when it got out (it was a matinée performance) I decided to have dinner outside in the Park Café. The wait wasn't bad at all, considering the weather and the crowds, only about fifteen minutes. It was about 6:30 when I finished, and instead of heading home, I decided to check out the Monster Percussion Concert at the Pritzker Pavilion, featuring students and faculty from the Northwestern University School of Music. I just stayed for the first half - it was great fun, though. Lots of little kids running around having an absolute blast! I was just sorry that I hadn't brought my camera, which I would have done had I known about the concert.

Tomorrow, I think I'm going to go to the Garfield Park Conservatory, and take pictures of Niki in the Garden.
mojosmom: (My House)
Three bedroom condo, with sun room, formal dining room, two baths, washer/dryer, dishwasher. Two blocks from bus to Olympic stadium, walking distance to stadium if you are feeling athletic yourself. Available summer, 2016. Exorbitant rent will finance owner's escape from the insanity.

Can you tell I'm not happy? Two more years of Mayor Daley lying about how this won't cost the taxpayers any money. Yeah, right. Could we all send positive vibes for Rio (or any other city that's in contention)?
mojosmom: (Default)
The Calatrava for Chicago:


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